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Cellular Telephones  - current as of  December 2008
by Chuck Husick

Cellular telephones can be as valuable on a boat as anywhere else. The availability of a nearby cellular transceiver site is the major limiting factor in their use. Except in boating intensive areas cellular coverage is directed inland, not toward the water. Even in areas where cellular use on boats justifies water area coverage the range for most hand-held phones will not exceed 4-5 miles. Special, fixed mount cellular phones, using more powerful transmitters than can be accommodated in typical hand sets are available. These phones are usually connected to antennas mounted as high as possible on a boats mast or superstructure. Due to the direct caller-to-called nature of cellular radio communication and the impossibility of direction finding for Coast Guard and other marine services relying exclusively on a cellular phone is not recommended.





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