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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
Posts: 29
Posted: July 19 2006 at 14:28 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

Hi All,

        I have owned 3 Carvers since 1999. We started with a 1999 Santego, moved to a 2001 396 ACMY, and now have a 2001 466 ACMY.  I have enjoyed all 3 boats and will be glad to share my knowledge of these boats.  I have selected email notification for any post made on the Carver forum and will try to respond promptly.

Capt. Gary

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Toronto
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Joined: December 25 2005
Posts: 8
Posted: July 28 2006 at 08:57 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi Gary: I currently own a Carver 3608 AC. Which i like very much. No more room on any other boat of same size. I am in final talks with my local Carver dealer to order a new 466 my.  I am however now considering the 58 Searay Sedan bridge.I realize to totally different boats. I love the 466. In my opinion you only get the full use of the lenght of the boat in a motor yacht.For me to get as much actual space out of a sedanbridge i need to go into the 56 foot range.Because the back 10 feet are engines. And if you want the same sized salon and master stateroom etc.. thats what you have to do. Thats the down side. But i like the idea of the straight through transom and sliding salon door walk thru. No stairs to go up at the rear and then down to get in the salon. I also looked at the 53 and 56 voyager for same reason but they have less interior space than the 466. Please tell me about any good or bad points about your 466. I was going to order mine with the hard top and the 575 volvo,s. Thanks Martin
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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
Posts: 29
Posted: July 28 2006 at 10:32 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

Hi Martin,

       We love our 466. We have had it a year now and keep discovering features that we like.  My wife really loves the large bridge and the large salon. We live in the south and boat mostly on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, I mention that because the the heat on the bridge in the summer with our black canvas binimi gets uncomfortable. However, ordering the hardtop version, you would not have that heat.

       We also looked at the 53 voyager for the same reason you did (all the steps on the 466). Your assessment of the interior size is correct. We had a dock neighbor who traded his 466 for a 53 voyager and his wife was commenting on how much stuff she had to carry home that wouldn't fit on the 53.

     We use the third "stateroom" (under the dinette area) for storage, but would have liked an office option for that room. We've used it as a guest room once, but the woman who stayed there complained it was stuffy. Kids might not notice or care.

      We did the Great Loop trip on a 396 Carver (gas), and we plan on continuing our extended cruising (another reason for switching to diesels). Therefore, that extra 10 feet of cockpit on a 53 or 56 would add $15 to $20 per night to the transient docking fees. While that is small dollars if you are only away from your marina 3 weekends a season, it adds up if you are doing extended cruising.  Of course, it also means a larger permanent slip, and a larger annual slip fee.

     Our boat is powered with the Cummings 450's. These engines do a good job, so those volvo's would move it even better.

Gary



Edited by gbarger on July 28 2006 at 10:34
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Toronto
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Joined: December 25 2005
Posts: 8
Posted: July 28 2006 at 15:36 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Thanks for the reply Gary: The 466 is at the top of the list. I looked at the 506 MY (Whitch is no longer in production, would have to find used) because it is very similar to the 466 and I liked the idea of all glass on the bridge with no canvas to deal with. Its a pain to look through in the rain.However upon a closer look i was quite dissappointed in the 506. Carver try,s to cram to many things in to the 506 and the end result is everything ends up being smaller in size than the 466.The galley space is smaller,the master stateroom is smaller,Three full size heads end up being smaller. One thing i found annoying about the 466 is the bridge canvas meets up with the front windsheild frame right at eye level. I found when driving the boat i had to bend down or stand up to see.Sitting puts the frame at eye level.Third room is great for storage.I also did not like the stove right under the cupboard in the galley. any kind of a flare up from a frying pan and you have a burnt cupboard.I know the 466 in detail but have not yet taken a close look at the Searay 58 Sedan bridge yet. Happy boating. Martin
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Toronto
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Joined: December 25 2005
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Posted: July 28 2006 at 15:38 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

P.S Forgot to mention how quiet the 466 was during seatrial. Very nice no exhaust sound at all.
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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
Posts: 29
Posted: July 28 2006 at 20:06 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

I agree it is a very quiet bridge.  We are on our boat today and have wifi at the marina. I had not noticed the frame interfering with vision, so I went up to check. I am 6 foot 1 inch.The frame is not in my line of vision. I am looking well under it. The helm seat is adjustable. I suspect you need to lower it and it should be fine.

The lid on the range top has to be raised, and my wife says it protects the cupboard over the range when she is cooking. She cooks most of the time we are on the boat, and she has no complaints about the galley. But they may have changed the galley a bit since our 2001 model was built.

Gary

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Toronto
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Posted: July 29 2006 at 09:25 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi again Gary: I,m 6' 1"  as well and noticed the blocked vision when at cruise just below plane when the boat is tilted bow up. probably around 1400 rpm.As far as i know there has not been any design changes since original except for the booth style dinette now instead of the curved seating that you have. Martin
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prodigalson
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Joined: May 10 2005
Posts: 3
Posted: July 31 2006 at 12:04 | IP Logged Quote prodigalson

Can either of you describe (or better yet, provide pics of) the "third cabin" on the 466? I can't find much info on it other than it exsists! Thanks.
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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
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Posted: August 01 2006 at 20:56 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

hi,

 here is a link to my website and a picture of the stateroom, that is under the dinette. it has a twin bed. Only someone under 4 feet in height can stand up in there.

 

http://www.calypsopoet.net/Carver%20466%20July%202005%20017. jpg

Our website contain our journal and picture of our great loop trip.

http://www.calypsopoet.net

 

Gary

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Artie
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Joined: September 12 2006
Posts: 3
Posted: September 12 2006 at 16:01 | IP Logged Quote Artie

Hi Martin (and Gary), thought I'd throw my 2 cents in about the 466. We've had 11 boats including 3 Sea Rays (largest a 40 Sedan Bridge) and 2 Carvers (largest a 444 CPMY). Current boat is 2005 Carver 46 MY (just a new name for the 466).

Before we bought it we looked seriously at SeaRay 52 and 58 Sedans as well as Carver 53 and 56 voyagers. All are great boats with high quality and excellent handling. Styling is different between SeaRays and Carvers, but both are beautifully done. We were disappointed that the SeaRay 52 had the master in the v-berth, not very roomy and not cool for a 52-foot boat. We were similarly dissapointed that the SeaRay 58 had a master where you couldn't walk onto or around the bed due to the reduced headroom. You had to duck down to get to the bed. Definitely not cool for a 58 foot boat of that price.

As for steps, tho the Sedans require no steps to enter from the cockpit, there are alot of steps to get to the bridge which we figured would average out in the long run since we like to go up to the bridge alot. On the 46 we sit on the back deck most of the time. Since its elevated and has a great view we dont need to go the bridge for comfortable sitting. We've had 12 people sitting around the back deck.

Overall the 46 has been an ideal boat. Plenty of room (more than the 52 and 58 SRs), very upscale (love the granite, SR has plastic galley) in a woody, traditional style. Everything about the boat is upscale and of excellent fit and finish. We have Volvo Penta TAMD 75 EDC (480 each) which has been plenty powerful enuf for us. The new 46 comes with D9s, which have more power and are more technically advanced - I think they have common rail (excellent!).

The handling and stability are outstanding. We've been in 30mph blows with 6-foot seas and the boat performed flawlessly (wish I could say the same for myself). The boat was tight and rigid (so was I) and surprisingly dry. That heavy duty welded aluminum structure really works.

What are the negatives? Hot Bridge! We live in south Texas and the summer (and spring and fall) are murder. Given the choice I'd get the newly available bridge hardtop and the outside A/C package. Other than that the 46 has surpassed our expectations in every way and for the first time ever I'm not going to trade in after 2 years. I'm actually planning to purchase the Volvo Penta 5-yr extended warranties.

Hope this helps. Its a tough choice you have, but an enviable one. We've loved both the SeaRays and Carvers, and both the Sedans and Mototyachts. Whatever you choose, you've got a winner.  Best Regards and Good Luck! Artie.



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swhotshot
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Joined: September 21 2006
Posts: 5
Posted: September 21 2006 at 10:19 | IP Logged Quote swhotshot

Gary:

With the numerous Carvers that you have owned, do you have any experience with their raw water cooled gas engines?  I haven't had any problems but I have been concerned about the potential for problems using salt water to cool these big engines over time. I have never thought that using raw salt water to cool was a super fantastic idea.

I flush them with fresh water when ever I get chance, which probably is not as ofter as it should be done.

 

 

 



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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
Posts: 29
Posted: September 21 2006 at 10:31 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

Hi,

    Sorry, I have no experience with raw water cooled, mine all had heat exchanges and anti-freeze. Plus 90% of my cruising is in fresh water anyway, so also not alot of salt water exposure.

 

Gary

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swhotshot
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Joined: September 21 2006
Posts: 5
Posted: September 21 2006 at 10:45 | IP Logged Quote swhotshot

Okay, thanks anyway.

I have posted a Topic on the subject to see if anyone does.

 

George



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Toronto
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Joined: December 25 2005
Posts: 8
Posted: September 22 2006 at 08:43 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi Artie: Sorry about delayed response. Haven,t checked this site for a bit.

I appriciate your comments very much. I think i will go with the Carver 466. I have heard comments about there poor rough water capabilities, but i boat in the Great Lakes area not in the ocean. So overly rough conditions should not really be an issue. Your description of comming through 6 footers with out any problems sounds reasureing.The day i took a 466 out for a sea trial it was blowing hard with some good white caps and we had no problems cruising at 20 mph. I am definately going with the hard top and bridge air and aft deck air units. Also the biggest engines i can get. Volvo D9 575 hp. How well do you find the salon heat and air unit to keep up. Does it struggle to cool in the hot weather. Thanks for your comments. Martin

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gbarger
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Joined: March 30 2000
Posts: 29
Posted: September 22 2006 at 09:18 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

I will also reply to the 466 salon air question.  I boat in the south with typical days up in the upper 90s and the air conditioners inside do a fine job. I have never felt that they weren't keeping the salon and staterooms cool.  On my 466, if all the units are off when arriving at the boat, if I turn on all 4units at the same time, and with all 4 compressors startup at the same time that the power surge will sometimes trip the line 2 main breaker.  However, I have never had them trip it once they have been runninig and are cycling on and off. So I just turn on 3 when I first get on board, then in about 5 minutes turn on the 4th one. you might not have this with yours, but thought I would mention it.

Gary

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Toronto
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Joined: December 25 2005
Posts: 8
Posted: September 22 2006 at 09:43 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi Gary: Haven,t chatted with you in a little while. I have a solution for your air problem. I am guessing that you are running Marine Air units with the digital control panel. If this is the case. Go into the program mode, and scroll down to the compressor start up catagory. Here you can program when the compressor kicks in after the power is turned on. You have to program each panel on its own. It,s about a 30 sec job. I don,t know how familiar you are with this but its easy. I dont know which number applies to the air system off hand. My instruction booklet is on the boat. But i can give you that info tomorrow if it is of help. My boat has 3 units. Which i programmed so when i flip on the breaker each air unit kicks on about 30 seconds apart from each other so you don,t get the draw all at once and pop the breaker. It is easy  to do. If you are not familiar with it let me know and i will walk you through it step by step when i grab the instructions. There are about 12 different settings that can be programed.  Martin
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gbarger
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Posted: September 22 2006 at 13:58 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

HI Martin,
        Thanks for the suggestion, I can do that. I have gone into and programed other features, such as fan stays on. I just didnt know that there was that option to put delays on the compressor startup.  I will do what you suggested on my next trip to the boat.
         You will love your new 466.
 
Gary
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Toronto
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Posts: 8
Posted: September 22 2006 at 14:42 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi Gary :Glad to help. The 466 should be a great boat. Only thing is i have to wait till May of next year now. I also looked at a 2005 Neptunus MY 62 ft with 790 hrs on it , and spotless for same price as new Carver 466. Decisions decisions. Martin
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Toronto
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Posted: September 22 2006 at 15:47 | IP Logged Quote Toronto

Hi Artie again: I just re read your post again. You said you were going to purchase the extended Volvo warranty. Can you tell me a little about it. What is the cost? I take it you do not have to decide at time of original purchase. How long do you have to decide? Is it time or hours. What does it cover? Thanks Martin
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Artie
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Posted: September 26 2006 at 16:26 | IP Logged Quote Artie

Hi Martin, looks like Gary answered your question about the ACs on the 46. Gary, you're right on. The 46 comes with 54,000 BTUs of AC, that's 4 1/2 tons, as much as many houses have. Like Gary, we're in the south too (South Texas) and we're usually in the 90's from April thru October, close to 100 for June thru mid-Sept.

We also leave the ACs off during the week and turn them on for the weekend. We've programmed them to start 15 seconds apart (15, 30, 45, 60) and have never blown a curcuit breaker. Even with all 4 ACs going theres plenty of power left for the rest of the boat. All this AC power chills the boat real fast, and they're cycling  in about 10-15 minutes, depending on the outside temp and sun conditions. For the Great Lakes area there's enuf AC power to freeze you out.

One suggestion: to save juice and wear and tear on the ACs we leave them off when we're not on the boat. We bought a home dehumidifier at Home Depot for $150 which we put in the salon, and attach a hose to drain into a shower sump, and add a few small fans to circulate the air when we're gone. Leaves the boat quite dry (you can set the humidity level you want) - no moisture or mildew. We hide it in the 3rd cabin when we come aboard. It looks like R2D2.

As for the Volvo Penta warranties, we received enrollment forms from VP in the mail last month, about 3 months before our 2-year warranty ends. A few things come warranted for up to 5 years, but most everything expires at 2 years. They're asking $2995 per engine for my TAMD75 EDCs. This extends the  warranty for 3 more years and covers just about everything, including parts and labor.

Does anyone know about these kind of warranties? Are they worth it? Local sales people I know say that extended warranties sometimes help sell a boat faster and can add a premium to the sales price, so even if you don't use the warranty its worth it, but I just don't know. I do know that its unbelieveably expensive to work on these big diesels. A friend of mine with an '04 39-foot Sea Ray MY blew a 480CE Cummins after doing the Great Loop: $35k to repair. I've got 2 more months to decide, since VP told me you have to buy the extended warranty while the original warranty is in effect. Their warranty phone number is 800-235-7549.

Sorry for the long-winded message. I've got to learn to write more briefly. Thanks, Artie

 



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wmbutler
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Joined: September 27 2006
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 01:39 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

Just bought a Carver 396 and am new to big boats. My last was a 21' Wakeboard boat. Is there a good resource online for nautical range on this boat at various speeds / RPM? I am going to transport the boat (with some seasoned help) but was trying to do some research on my own regarding fuel cost and speed for the trip. I have the 8.1 GI Volvo engines (gas).

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Volvo Gas Engines
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Mariner350
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 07:42 | IP Logged Quote Mariner350

  The two sources that I find reliable are the Carverownersclub and Boattest.I think that boattest  tested the Carver 396 in both the gas and diesel versions.
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gbarger
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 09:37 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

Hi,

     My previous boat was a 2001 396 that my wife and I did the great loop with. I had over 1400 hours and 10000 miles on that boat. You have a great boat, we would still have it but we wanted to move up to diesel engines so we traded for its big bother a 466.

     Now your question. Your two best cruising speeds for fuel economy are going to be the hull speed (trawler speed) and the speed just after it goes on plane.  The reason I am giving it as speed instead of rpm, is that the rpm to obtain that speed will vary depending on the amount of gear,fuel, water, people that are on board.

     At your hull speed, which will be at 7.9 mph (rpm range 1800-2100) you will get approximately 1 mile per gallon.   So, with the fuel capacity 330 gallons, using 20% reserve, you will have a range of 265 miles.     When on plane, your speed will be slightly different than mine as even mine varied with the boat's load, but around 21 mph give or take 1mph, rpm range 3700-4100, you will be burn about 2.2 gallons per mile. With the same 20% reserve, you will have a range of 122 miles.

     The above fuel comsumption is based on no genset running. The genset on the 396 will burn about .9 gallons an hour, so if you are running it while crusiing, you are burning an additional one gallon per hour.

     My observation of boat magazines reviews is that performance data is not obtainable in real life. The magazine boat reviews generally have low weight on board,  no water in fresh water, empty holding tanks, 1/3 fuel on board, zero personal gear items, and two people. The props are perfectly tuned prior to test and the hulls were just power washed.

Gary

gary@calypsopoet.net

www.calypsopoet.net

 

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wmbutler
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 09:53 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

That is great info. Thanks. I just purchased it in CT and am bringing it down to TN. I'm awaiting some information from a land-based mover before I decide whether to have it delivered 100% over land or bring it down the Atlantic to NC and then come across I-440. I am told that the height could be an issue in the northern states and that a portion of the boat's bridge may need to be removed in order to keep it under 12-13 feet overall once on the trailer.

This is quite a learning experience. I've estimated (very rough) that it's about 600 miles from CT to NC over water and have explored some routes between the two. I have a friend who has also done the Great Loop and I expect I will be picking his brain regarding the route.

Since I have a few items that need fixing, I expect I will post a few more times to this board with questions on the best places to get Carver-specific supplies (for example: the icemaker door!).




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gbarger
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 10:45 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

      Trucking will be cheaper. Trucking will be cheaper from the place of purchase. The bridge will have to be removed but that is the way Carver designed the boat. All the wiring is coded and connector specific so it can not be hooked up wrong. An experienced boat transport company will have no problems with removing and then re-assembly.  They will have to remove the bridge even if you take the boat to North Carolina by water. The waterline bridge clearance is around 19 feet, there is 3 feet of boat under the water (3 1/2 if you count props), and if on a trailer 2 feet about ground. So, if you add those 19+3+2, you would have around 24 feet height on that trailer, too tall even for the south.

     When we purchased our 396, it was on a land locked lake, and was trucked with the bridge removed, no problem at all.

     Unless you are just wanting the experience of boating on the east coast, then truck it from where you bought it.

     Carver is very supportive of its dealers.What I mean by that is Carver specific parts and gear with Carver name on it, is generally only available from a Carver dealer's part department. If you contact Carver directly, they will direct you to a local dealer. Tennessee has two good dealers (my boat is currently on the Tennessee river) Jim Bennett Yacht sales and Erwin Marine Sales. However, most all the componets on Carvers and with most boats, come from a limited number of OEM manufactors, so you can general get what you need from the original manufactor and a cheaper price, it just won't have Carver name on it.

   For example, my icemaker is made by U-Line and I can get all the parts for it from U-Line.

Gary

 

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wmbutler
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 11:19 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

You have been a HUGE HELP. Thanks!

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Artie
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 16:43 | IP Logged Quote Artie

A boater in our marina bought a gas-powered 396 in New England several years ago (not sure where) and had it trucked to Texas. He drove the boat to a Carver dealer and had them prepare it for shipping (remove the bridge, etc), and then had it delivered to a Carver dealer on the Gulf coast who put it back together.

Gary, do you think this is a better idea than having the trucking company do the disassembly and reassembly? The dealers probably charge more, but they are very familiar with the boats.

Artie



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gbarger
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Posted: September 27 2006 at 17:22 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

I would agree that having the boat prepared by and then re-assembled by a Carver experienced crew would be best. I would think that either of the two Carver dealers based in Tennessee could give referals for boat transporters that they have used. 

 

Gary

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wmbutler
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Posted: October 03 2006 at 15:20 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

I contacted the dealer in Rhode Island (boatworldri.com) to remove the bridge. This was the response:

>Hi Bill:

>I can only suggest using the closest marina.  We honestly don't have the time or >equipment available at this time of year.

>Regards,
>Pete

So, I guess I might need to do this myself. Does anyone know what this entails? Is it a one person job or are we talking 5 people and a crane. I literally have no concept for what I'm in for. I am going to call a local Carver dealer to get some advice, but any comments would be appreciated if you have the time.


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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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dayodan
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Joined: September 13 2006
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Posted: October 03 2006 at 20:02 | IP Logged Quote dayodan

Aw hell, run the boat on it's bottom.  Gas prices are down and I'll bet you could find a volunteer crew here.  I'll be the first!      Dan

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DanO
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wmbutler
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Posts: 23
Posted: October 03 2006 at 21:16 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

That's the spirit! If I had the time right now, I'd be all over it!

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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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dayodan
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Posted: October 03 2006 at 22:32 | IP Logged Quote dayodan

Make the time man, life's too short!

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wmbutler
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Posted: October 03 2006 at 22:43 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

I haven't run the numbers, but I think it would be at least a 2500 mile trip to TN via water and I'd still have to take it out to put in my lake of choice!

I even toyed with leaving it in South Florida for some Bahamas trips over the winter but I know that I'll miss it if it's not near me....especially since I just purchased it.


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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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wmbutler
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Posted: October 04 2006 at 14:24 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

Quote: gbarger

At your hull speed, which will be at 7.9 mph (rpm range 1800-2100) you will get approximately 1 mile per gallon.   So, with the fuel capacity 330 gallons, using 20% reserve, you will have a range of 265 miles.     When on plane, your speed will be slightly different than mine as even mine varied with the boat's load, but around 21 mph give or take 1mph, rpm range 3700-4100, you will be burn about 2.2 gallons per mile. With the same 20% reserve, you will have a range of 122 miles.

    Gary

gary@calypsopoet.net

www.calypsopoet.net

 



Getting back to your previous comment, Gary, will I get better range by operating below hull speed (say 7 mph?). I have noticed on several graphs for other boats that the range dramatically increases as speed decreases only slightly.

If the answer is yes, and you were to make an educated guess based on past experience, how much could I improve my range by running at 7 mph? I'm basically thinking that I would budget this as an 8 day trip running on 2 tanks of gas for 600 miles and am curious to know if you think it is realistic.



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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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gbarger
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Posted: October 04 2006 at 15:32 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

  Hi,

       I would think that the decrease in fuel consumption by running at 7 mph vs 8 mph would increase the range a little, but even at a 10 % increase your range goes from 265 tyo 291.  Remember that range is also with a 20% fuel reserve left in the tanks.

      If your question was can I make 600 miles on 2 full fuel tanks of gas (330x2) 660 gallons then yes, even at the 8 mph your are burning around  1 gallon per mile so you would only burn 600 gallons.

     You might be under estimating the time required.  With daylight hours decreasing, it will be hard to get more than 11 hours of travel time.   (7 mphx11 hours = 77 miles per day).  While it might take 8 travel days to do the 600 miles, there will be some weather days, when travel is not advisable. Moving the boat into unfamilar waters in bad weather is not a good. Also, trying to find a marina's entrance and slip in the dark is also not any fun.

      Marinas and anchorages are not spaced exactly 77 miles apart. So when planning your next stop, you will need to look at the projected max distance to the next marina/anchorage as 77 miles, but  you might have to stop having only 60 miles traveled as that is where the next marina/anchorage is located. Of course you can go faster to average the 77 miles per day, but then there goes the fuel consumption.

     I think if you have the time, and since you will not be keeping the boat on the east coast, you should consider cruising on the east coast for the experience and fun. If you start the trip with the time restriction of only 8 days availabe to complete the trip, then the pressure to make the miles per day will lead you to not enjoy the trip and prehaps get into a difficult situation.  In summary have fun, do the trip, but allow a few more days.    

      Also, back your your question about removing the bridge from another post, yes it does required a power lift (crane).  When my boat was delivered the delivery company's truck had the lift on the truck. I would think that if you contact Erwin Marine Yacht Sales, they can give you the name of boat delivery companies that they use to disassemble and move their Carver's.

Gary

    

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wmbutler
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Posted: October 04 2006 at 16:30 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

Got it. Regarding the scheduling, I was budgeting 10 days total (2 mulligans). Sounds like I should increase it to 12 or 14 days to be safe. I will have two others on board who can pilot the boat as well, so hopefully this will minimize fatigue.





Looks like I would start out at 6:00 am each day by late October and want to be safely tucked away by no later than 5:00 pm.

I do plan on enjoying the trip (even though it may not sound like it at the moment). More as I get closer.


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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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gbarger
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Posted: October 04 2006 at 16:44 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

      Sounds like you have a good plan. That speed is relaxing, my wife and I can do 12 hour days just the 2 of us. Glad your plan included being at a safe harbor by 5pm.  You will have a great time.  Please contact me with any other questions. While I have lots of Carver owner experience and boating experience, I also have my captains license and enjoy helping people boat fun and safe.
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dayodan
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Posted: October 04 2006 at 20:48 | IP Logged Quote dayodan

Sounds like you've decided to go for it.  Good luck and have a great trip.

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wmbutler
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Posted: October 08 2006 at 14:48 | IP Logged Quote wmbutler

I'd like some opinions on this. The boat does not currently have an autohelm. It does have a GPS and we'll have a portable chart plotter. I've priced the RayMarine 8002 S1G package at $1695 + $2100 installation (24 hrs at $90/hr).

Question 1: Is an autohelm absolutely critical for an 8 day trip from CT to VA, travelling 9 - 10 hours per day with 3 people capable of steering in shifts? If safety is a factor, I don't want to skimp, but please chime in with your thoughts regarding the safety vs. convenience/fatigue factor.

I have plans to install an auto-helm, but ultimately, I'd like to do it once the boat gets to my home slip, where I have time to install it myself and save the $2100 while learning during the installation process. I'm fairly technical and am able follow installation procedures well. So, Question 2: Given that the boat is safely at my home dock, is it reasonable to expect that I can install an autohelm at a leisurely pace, or am I just fooling myself?


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2001 Carver 396
Volvo Gas Engines
Nashville, TN
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gbarger
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Posted: October 08 2006 at 15:55 | IP Logged Quote gbarger

    I guess you have two questions,  an autohelm with 3 people sharing helm duties would be a luxury item. It is certainly not a safety item. My wife and I did the entire great loop without an autopilot.

    I do have an autohelm/autopilot on my current boat.  I did install it myself, it was a fairly straight forward installation.  Only you know your technical abilities, but sounds like you probally can do it, since you are confident enough of your skills to even consider it.

Gary

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