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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: March 31 2012 at 11:19 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

I haven't been posting lately because I've been busy with another problem.  The north channel to Piney Narrows has shoaled-in to the point where 50' boats can't safely get through the channel.  And since my Connie is docked in Piney Narrows this is a major concern to me.

Re-dredging is an expensive process ($1.5 million) and neither the State nor Federal government has the money to pay for dredging.  So I've been working to build up enough public interest to get the channel dredged.  Happily, money has been found and the channel will be dredged.  But I'm not sure whether that will happen this year or next. 

Unfortunately, the channel will shoal in again in three years and we will have to go through this process again.  I'm beginning to think it would be wise to move my Connie out of Piney Narrows.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: April 01 2012 at 14:26 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Tim, Pete and all,

I am well aware the 46' Connies came with 6v71's; the 2 was a typo. Sorry about that.

Pete, I think it would we the right choice to leave Piney Narrows. I believe you own a condo slip there so how hard would it be to sell? I imagine they have gone down a lot in value along with most things especially with the water depth situation.

Got back from the southeast coast last week just in time to enjoy the early warm weather and get the boat set for cruising and take in the 81 degree day. Now we are in Nevada and heading to California the first of the week. Looks like it got a cooler back home. Hopefully it will be warm again when we fly back next week .



__________________
DAVE
GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: April 01 2012 at 16:59 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Like yachts, slips for yachts have also depreciated very severely.  That's one reason I hesitate to sell.

I may just leave Piney Narrows and move to another marina.  I'd put the slip up for rent hoping to sell at a later date when the market has improved.

Pete37



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MarTex
"Seaman Recruit"




Joined: February 10 2012
Posts: 10
Posted: April 02 2012 at 14:13 | IP Logged Quote MarTex

Hey Pete (and Dave),

You were right about the boat name (Jeanne) and hull #.

Pix in the survey provided indicate she is in pretty rough shape as well.

Thanks for all the information.

Tim

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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: April 04 2012 at 19:57 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Water Pump System Rebuild

I started a water pump system rebuild March 7th and have been at it for about three weeks.  The idea was to move the water system pump from the generator room to the compartment under the galley which was pretty much empty.  This will free up space for a later auxiliary genny in the genny room.  In addition I’ve decided to make the new system have both AC and DC pumps.  The AC pump is my old shallow well jet pump.  It beats the hell out of DC pumps in terms of water pressure and flow rate.  I can get 12 gpm at 50 psi.

The picture below shows the AC pump in its new location.  I used Series 162 reinforced PVC tubing for the last couple feet to the pump.  It provides the flexibility you need to work in close quarters:

But when I don’t have AC (away from dock) the AC pump doesn’t produce anything.  So I need a DC pump alongside the AC pump for those situations.  I bought a Par-Max 4.3 gpm pump last year ago but just haven’t got around to installing it.  A better choice might have been a ShurFlo 5.7 gpm Extreme pump but they’re about $80 more and I need the DC pump only when I don’t have AC.

It took quite a while run hoses and electrical service to the new pump location.  And I had some persistent leaks which slowed me down.  But now the AC pump is in and working great so all I have to do is hook the DC pump in parallel with the AC pump and I’ll be ready to go.  DC power is already available in the Under Galley compartment.

I’ll use an AC relay to disable the DC pump when AC power is on.  When AC is off the relay will apply DC power to the Par-Max Pump.  And of course power to the AC and DC pumps can also be shut off by switches on the console.

See that little drip under the front of the pump.  It was a stubborn leak that just didn’t seem to want to go away but I finally sealed it today.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on April 04 2012 at 20:03


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: April 14 2012 at 12:49 | IP Logged Quote eshover

For any interested:
I have a Lectra San treatment system with controls. I
bought it five years ago from a sportfish owner who bought
it some time earlier and never installed, just dumps
overboard when fishing buds are on board. He stated it
was never used and when you look at the interior you'll see
that certainly looks as new. I can send pictures of all. I
paid $700 for it but never installed and purchased the Hold
and Storage system. I know there are many Chris Craft
and Hatts out there still using this older systems. This will
extend the life of treating your sewage at a fraction of the
cost of a new system. Raritan DOES NOT make or sell
these any more. I have the box, controls, wiring harness,
etc. you can email me at: eshover47@gmail.com if you
are interested.

Emory

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: April 21 2012 at 22:21 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Chesapeake Connies

Two years ago I made up a list of Connies (460s and 500s) known to be in the Chesapeake area.  There were 20. Today I checked it to see where they are now.  Nine have been sold and have changed owners.  Five are permanently for sale (on the books for over five years).  Two are recently for sale but the prices for each make it unlikely that they will ever sell.  Twelve (12) never had any correspondence with the forum.

Connies appear to be a rapidly dieing breed.

Pete37



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Capt.Wayne
"Seaman"




Joined: October 31 2007
Posts: 63
Posted: April 30 2012 at 18:17 | IP Logged Quote Capt.Wayne

Hi Pete,
Here is an update for your records. While traveling north from Naples, fl to Annapolis, MD we stopped for fuel at Saint Simmons Island, GA right after docking I saw a Connie 460 dock also. I talked to Lewis Haselwood the owner of the vessel DIVERSION I gave him our Murry CC www  and hoped to have him join us. you can reach him 864-370-2644 or lewis@lhaselwood.com he lives in Greenville, SC
Hope this helps

Capt.Wayne


__________________
Non-Marrital Asset
460 Connie
Isle of Capri, FL
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: May 04 2012 at 17:16 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Captain Wayne & All,

I had “Diversion” in my records but of course not the name and phone number of the owner.  Thanks for the info.  She’s a nice clean boat and I like her interior.  She’s for sale and I have the full set of broker’s pictures.  Don’t know how long she’s been on the market.  My pictures are dated December 2011 but they may not be the first set of pictures.

I still check out this web site occasionally but basically it’s dormant and will remain that way until I decide to rejuvenate it; if I decide to rejuvenate it.  And I’m still adding to the Connie DVD Library.  It is, after all, my notes on Connies.  I got about 10% of the stuff from the Forum but found out a long time ago that the web was a much better source of info.  About 90% of the stuff comes from the manufacturers of the components of the Connies.  So the dormancy of the Forum hasn’t affected the Connie Library very much.

A number of marine manufacturers have relocated here to Kent Island.  Buck Algonquin moved here a couple years ago and GROCO moved here this month.  GROCO (www.groco.net) made all the thru hulls and a lot of the other cast bronze components on the Connies.  For a long time I thought they had also made the stuffing boxes, shaft supports, rudder bearings, rudders, etc. but I found out that a lot of that stuff was made by Buck Algonquin (www.buckalgonquin.com).  Both companies have excellent catalogs that you can download.  I’ll also add them to the Connie Library.

I was pretty busy during April trying to get the North Channel to Piney Narrows dredged out.  It’s shoaled in to about 3’ so the larger boats (such as my Connie) can’t get through.  My initial requests for help met with a very cold response.  Neither the State nor Federal governments had any spare money ($1,500,000) for the job.  The attitude was “Why should we spend money for the benefit of the 1% in a recession”.  But later I pointed out that the 1% contributed $15,000,000 per year of boat related spending to the Narrows area economy and that we would lose most of it if the channel remained closed for a long time.  I also pointed out that the financial hardship of that loss would be borne by the local small businessmen rather than the 1%.  That seemed to register with the politicians as “lost votes” and the money was magically found.  However, unfortunately, not in time for this year’s ecological dredging season so it won’t be dredged until next winter.  But that’s much better than not dredging it at all.  So that’s how I’ve been wasting my time for the last month.

However, my Connie hasn’t taken a vacation on repairs.  Last winter, during winterization, the oil transfer system broke down so I wasn’t able to replace the old oil.  I had to wait until spring to do that.  I took my pump to the manufacturer twice and they repaired it but it broke down each time.  I finally had to replace the old oil transfer system with a new one.  That was expensive ($380) but it works very well and I was able to easily transfer the oil with the new system.  I was also able to reduce the mess of oil transfer.

While replacing my engine zincs and petcocks this spring I found that a lot of the holes into which they are threaded were gummed up by rust and zinc residue.  The zincs and petcocks wouldn’t thread into their holes the way they should.  That’s not surprising after 25 years of service.  So I bought three pipe taps (there are three different hole sizes) and used them to clean out the old threads.  This worked very well and the zincs and petcocks threaded into their respective holes quite easily.  I should mention that the lower zinc on the heat exchanger corrodes out very quickly and should be replace at least every spring.  Heat exchanger cores are very expensive!

I moved my fresh water pump from the Genny room the Under Galley (UG) compartment in March.  I reported on that previously.  It works quite well and dramatically reduces the clutter in the Genny room.  I now have all the parts necessary to install a DC pump in parallel to the existing AC shallow well jet pump.  This will give me pressure water even when there is no AC power.

The next job is to replace the packing on the engine shafts.  Started that last July but got sidelined to replacing all the hose clamps rather than the packing.  They needed to be replaced.  If you haven’t replaced yours recently do so now.

My genny has a faulty starter.  The mechanic will be out to replace it next week while he is working on the starboard engine riser.  You probably remember that I replaced the port engine riser last spring but deferred the starboard riser to this year to limit the cash flow.  But I started up both engines without any problems last week.  They started with a huge belch of smoke (as usual after winterization) but cleaned up and ran smoothly very quickly.

In a couple of days my high school helper will be down to help with the spring washdown, compounding and waxing of the topsides.  The hull will be buffed and waxed in the yard in about a week when the boat gets her annual hauling.

Last spring I varnished about half of the boat’s trim with Bristol varnish.  That’s the varnish which goes on quickly without having to wait a day between coats.  I got four coats on in less than two days.  So far it has worked quite well with no problems.  Of course my boat is under cover so the stress on the varnish is less.  I ordered more varnish today and will put four coats on the parts that were not varnished last year.  And I’ll put a single freshener coat on the other parts.

Last spring I also painted the cast iron engine supports for my Detroits.  They were very rusty and had been painted a couple times before but each time the rust got under the paint and destroyed the paint job.  This time I used a rust converter before I painted.  A rust converter is a chemical which converts the rust into a nonmetallic chemically stable surface which strongly adheres to the surface of the metal.  After the rust converter dries the new chemically stable surface is painted with a special paint which acts as a primer but does not require an overcoat.

After a year there is no rust except for one small spot that I missed when painting.  So it seems to work.  Now that I know how to paint rusty metal I’m going to do the rest of the engines.  This is a lengthy job which will probably last for more than a year.  But I’ll start this spring.  The system I’m using is called POR 15.  I’ll follow up with white engine enamel.

Hope your spring dewinterization period has been less hectic than mine,

Pete37, 5/4/2011



Edited by Pete37 on May 04 2012 at 17:20


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A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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Capt.Wayne
"Seaman"




Joined: October 31 2007
Posts: 63
Posted: May 04 2012 at 22:44 | IP Logged Quote Capt.Wayne

Pete,

Glad to help in the search for Constellations to inhance our user knowledge of Chris Craft Motor Yachts. I'm in Coin Jock, NC and will be in Annapolis, MD on Monday returning to Naples, FL on Thursday. If I can work it in, I'll come by Kent Narrows to check out your Yacht, with your work schedule, I'm sure you'll be there.

I appreciate all the work you've done on the web site, and the CD's you put together. Believe me, I've saved a lot of time and money with your and everyone that participates on this sites advice for maintenance, and retrofits.

Have a great day, hope to see you in Kent Narrows
Never give up the ship

Capt Wayne


__________________
Non-Marrital Asset
460 Connie
Isle of Capri, FL
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: May 05 2012 at 21:03 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject:  Bath Day

Well, Interlude got her first bath of the season today.  She needed it badly.  Actually it was a half-bath; I didn’t get the FB or transom.  I’ll get those tomorrow.  The high school kid who was supposed to help with the bath didn’t show.  My wife shanghaied him for work around the house.

Washing the boat is a pretty mundane process and you wouldn’t think I would have anything to say about it.  But there were two things that I don’t think the average owner knows.

First, the bases of the hand rails are stainless steel but they rust and leave ugly orange stains on the toe rails.  You can polish these out but there’s a much easier way to clean up the stains.  Buy a bottle of On- N-Off at your local marine emporium.  They don’t come with a spritzer but you can buy one or steal one from another bottle you have aboard.  Install the spritzer in the On-N-Off bottle.  Spritz the rusty bases of the hand rails.  It’s sort of like spritzing the dandelions in your lawn.  On-N-Off will not hurt your fiberglass; it’s specifically made to remove iron stains from fiberglass.  Let it sit for several minutes and then hose it off.  The stains should disappear.  If they don’t you may have to give them another spritz. 

Once you’re done run some water through the spritzer.  If you don’t the spritzer probably won’t work the next time you want to use it.  The bottle of On-N-Off should last for several years.  Don’t spray the railings and leave the chemicals on the railings for a long time.  The On-N-Off won’t damage you railings but it may leave a funny mottled look which you will have to polish out.  Five or ten minutes doesn’t seem to have any affect.

The second hint is about polishing your windows.  Start by washing them with a water and detergent mix.  Apply the mixture with a soaked rag.  An old T-shirt works well.  Now rinse thoroughly with a hose, let the water drain off and then use a squeegee to clean the window.  But don’t use T-shirts or anything made of cotton for the final cleaning of the window.  Cotton has oil in it which will leave an annoying oily sheen.  The window will look clean but never squeaky clean.

After squeegeeing the window it’s about as clean as it will ever get.  But on old glass (particularly on glass that has been exposed to salt water) you will see annoying streaks that don’t seem to come out with any method of cleaning.  What has happened is that the salt has etched the glass.  Cleaning will not get the streaks out.  In fact nothing short of optical polishing with fine optical abrasives will get the streaks out.

But you can reduce the effects of the streaks by applying a wax.  Ordinary boat waxes will do.  This will also make the water run off more quickly.  The wax partially fills in the etched areas making them less apparent.

Pete37, 5/5/2012



Edited by Pete37 on May 05 2012 at 21:08


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A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: May 06 2012 at 17:07 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Attrition

Back on April 21st I did an analysis of what had happened to the owners of Connies in the Chesapeake area:  Basically the results are shown in the following table:

Ownership Status

#

%

Sold and changed owners

9

45

Permanently for sale

5

25

Recently for sale

2

10

Destroyed

0

0

No Longer in Documentation

0

0

No change in ownership

4

20

Totals

20

100

As the table shows there were 20 Connies in the survey.  The time period was for the last two years (2010-2011).  About 45% had been sold and changed owners.  About 25% of the Connies are permanently for sale meaning that they have been on the market for five or more years.  This usually means that they are priced too high or that they are in terrible condition.  About 10% have recently gone on the market.  A total of 16 out of 20 Connies (80%) were had either been sold or were for sale.  This leaves only 4 (20%) of the owners that were still actively using their Connies.

That means that if all 20 were participating in the Forum two years ago only four (4) would be left now.  But only 12 ever had any participation in the Forum so you would expect only (12/20) x 4 =2.4 to be left.  Since owners tend to be discrete rather than fractional I’ll round that up to 3 owners.

Twenty (20) is a rather small statistical sample so I decided to do another survey and selected all 1986 Connie 500s as a sample.  I rounded off the sample so that it was also 20 boats for easy comparison with the previous survey.  The time period was 2007-2011 (4 years). This time I got the results shown in the table below:

Ownership Status

#

%

Sold and changed owners

6

30

Permanently for sale

5

25

Recently for sale

2

10

Destroyed

1

5

No Longer in Documentation

1

5

No change in ownership

5

25

Totals

20

100

Surprisingly the number sold dropped from 45% to only 30% in this sample (a difference of 15% or 3 boats).  The number permanently for sale stayed the same at 5 (25%) and the number recently for sale stayed the same at 2 (10%).  The number of boats Destroyed and/or No Longer in Documentation) accounts for 2 boats (10%).  And surprisingly the number with no change on ownership increased by 1 to 25%.  In spite of the longer time period, the total of boats either sold or in the process of being sold was only 13 or 65% of the boats.  I attribute this to the fact that the samples are small and independent.  Therefore, a certain amount of statistical variation (3) is not unexpected.

The bottom line is that due to the constant selling and reselling of Connies, owners active in the Forum are lost when the Connie changes hands.  When this is added to the boats destroyed and those no longer in documentation, the Forum can lose 60% to 80% of its participants in only a few years.

Over the past six years we have also lost about 6 owners who got pissed off because I didn’t approve of their pet projects.  It’s regrettable but unavoidable.  I can’t be just a rubber stamp for everything an owner proposes.  If the proposal would be bad for the members of the Forum I try to discourage it.

One owner per year is a tolerable loss but 60% to 80% every few years is not sustainable.

The one good factor among so many bad ones is that for every forum participant we lose when he sells his Connie we have a new Connie owner who is a potential forum participant.  The only way to capitalize on this is to write letters to each of these potential new participants inviting them to join the Forum.

I have been delinquent in not pursuing this letter writing campaign but it’s a lot of work and even now I’m not sure I want to take on this task.

Pete37, 5/6/2012



Edited by Pete37 on May 06 2012 at 17:08


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INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: May 07 2012 at 08:21 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Hi Pete, Wayne and all,

Good to hear from you Capt Wayne. Just checked my email and saw your post on being in Annapolis on Monday. I was at the boat for three days (on the Sassafras, Georgetown, MD) but had to be home today; would have liked to see you again. In your travels if you get near Philadelphia let me know. I live only a short distance away in New Jersey, right off Route 295 and a few minutes off Route 95. Hope to get to Naples this coming winter.

Pete and all,

Upon commissioning the master head it did not have intake water flow (it uses sea water). I have a Raritan toilet. I took off the intake hose from the rear of the toilet pump and opened the seacock and no water flow resulted. Then I connected a test hose to the rear toilet pump with the other end into a bucket of water and pushed the flush botton and it worked fine. Obviously the problem is between the seacock and the connecting hose. I ran out of time to investigate further. I suspect a blocked seacock. The seacock handle moves freely. Coming off the the secock is a 45 degree pipe that has what looks like a metal check valve (or something??) in-line. This 45 degree pipe setup unfortunately extends the pipe past where a hose can be connected to rig up a blow out hose for the seacock, but maybe I could just use the hose that conconnects to the rear pump. The seacock is located under the master head sink via a small inspection hatch.  I will check if there is a blockage in the hose first. My question is, what is that fitting off the seacock for and can I blow out the seacock with this in-line? If it is a check valve I assume it must be set up to keep water from going out from the toilet and keep water in the line, therfore hindering blowing out. Any info or suggestions would be appreciated.  



__________________
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GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: May 07 2012 at 09:32 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

I'm not sure what that fitting is for but since your Connie and mine are very similar I'll take a look at mine.  I assume you have Groco seacocks because all my seacocks are Groco.  Groco is now on Kent Island so perhaps I can talk to them.  I'll try to take a photo of my setup.

Perhaps there is a vented loop between the head and the seacock to prevent seawater from getting into the boat through the head intake. Most toilet hookups that use seawater have vented loops on their seawater intake lines.  An air leak or blockage there could prevent the head's intake pump from drawing water.  The 45 degree fitting may just be required due to plumbing clearance requirements.

I checked my recods and found the following in my files:

"There are 11 underwater thru-hulls with seacocks on a typical Connie.  They are:

Thru-Hull Seacocks

#

System

Function

Location

1

Fwd. Head

Raw water intake

Forward cabin bilge

2*

Guest Head

Raw water intake

Port aft corner of engine room

3*

Master Head

Raw water intake

Stbd aft corner of engine room

4*

Fwd. Head

Overboard discharge

Port side of forward cabin bilge

5

San-X #1

Treated-water discharge

6*

Guest Head

Common Overboard discharge

Port fwd corner of engine room

Master Head

7

San-X #2

Treated-water discharge

8

Port Engine

Raw-water intake

Stbd side of port engine

9

Stbd Engine

Raw-water intake

Port side of stbd engine

10

Generator

Raw-water intake

Port side of generator room

11

Air Conditioner

Raw-water intake

Stbd side of generator room

It is a good idea to keep this list on your boat.  You will have to turn off all these seacocks during winterization and if you forget one you could sink your boat.

On the original Connies there were three Galley Maid heads discharging either overboard or to a Sealand San-X treatment system.  Each head had a separate raw water intake thru-hull.  The forward head had two discharge thru-hulls; an overboard and San-X discharge.  The master and guest head outputs were joined with a Tee and also discharged into two thru- hulls; an overboard and San-X discharge.    In all there were 7 thru-hulls dedicated to the heads.

Many of the Connies have been converted to more modern heads which use fresh water taken from the boat’s potable water tank and discharge their output into a holding tank.  This eliminates the need for the three head intake thru-hulls and for three of the head discharge thru-hulls.  All of the heads are plumbed to discharge into the holding tank leaving only one dedicated head thru-hull for the offshore holding tank discharge."

Note that the master head intake thru hull should be in the starboard aft corner of the engine room.  As I remember the intake hose goes from the engine room under the den/office and enters the master head through the head's forward bulkhead into the area area under the sink..  It then runs to the master head toilet intake.

Hope this helps,

Pete27, 5/7/2011



Edited by Pete37 on May 07 2012 at 12:00


__________________
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A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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David Ross
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Posted: May 07 2012 at 14:46 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete,

Thanks for getting back to me.  Cannot see any manufacturer info on the seacock. My raw water master head (Raritan) intake seacock is right under the sink through an access hatch in the vanity to the bilge. The hose from the seacock under the vanity runs only a short distance under the vanity and comes out through the vanity at floor level to the back of the head's rear intake pump. The overboard discharge seacock (electronic LetraSan) is located in the engine room behind the stbd engine, centered about midway from the stringers and bulkhead with the LectraSan mounted in the the corner by the hull.

Just for your information the hallway head (guest head) intake seacock is in front of the vanity under an access hatch in the floor (another short run). The discharge seacock and Lectra San are located in the engine room behind the port engine in a mirror image of the master setup. The forward head intake seacock is in the forward cabin bilge port side and the discharge seacock is on the stbd. A third LetraSan (all on board LectrSans are the electronic, not the old dail style) is located between the forward bilge and a hatch in the galley by the step into the forward stateroom.



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Pete37
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Posted: May 07 2012 at 17:01 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Unfortunately, my boat came with Galley Maid Heads (3) and Sealand San-X Treatment systems (2).  Both were highly unreliable and kept me busy repairing them for the first ten years I owned my Connie.  One head (sometimes two) would break down every year.  I got pretty expert in repairing them but it was a PITA to keep them in repair.  And the sea water in the bowl fermented and stank to hell after a few days.

So I replaced the heads with Jabsco Quiet Flush heads (which flush with fresh water) and the treatment system with a holding tank.  It was an enormous improvement.  The heads work flawlessly.  Haven't had to fix one yet in over seven years. And the fresh flush water never ferments or stinks.

I got rid of the old stuff but still have the manuals and the old heads were hooked up with vented loops on both their input and output plumbing.  With the new system using fresh water input and a holding tank no vented loops are needed but the seawater version Jabsco head diagrams also show vented loops on both input and output.

I'm pretty sure that I don't have any thru-hulls below the guest or master heads but the boat is going to be hauled next week and I'll look for them.  I've never heard of a head system that used one way valves although some of the boat's fresh water plumbing does.  My fresh water flushed Jabsco heads do use solenoid controlled valves to control input of the fresh flush water though.  The seawater flushed versions use vented loops.

I checked Raritan's web site for head hookups.  Don't know which model you have but the Crown II head is shown below:

As can be seen they use vented loops on the intake too (at least on this model).

Pete37, 5/7/2012



Edited by Pete37 on May 07 2012 at 17:27


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David Ross
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Posted: May 08 2012 at 10:04 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete,

I found out that is a check valve. I will make sure the hose between the seacock and head is not blocked, which I doubt is the problem. Then I'll concentrate on that check valve and seacock setup. 



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Pete37
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Posted: May 10 2012 at 14:37 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Again we find that not all Connies are made alike.  The check valve is kind of unusual.  I've never seen one used that way.  But if it works, it works.

Pete37



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Pete37
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Posted: May 30 2012 at 18:00 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Off-Shore Power Independence

Last year there were a lot of posts on the subject of how to achieve off-shore power independence.  “Off-Shore” in these articles really just meant any time you’re not tied up to a dock with shore power.  There were two basic modes of doing this. 

The first method was by using large deep-discharge battery banks.  These banks would be charged up while shore power was available and/or when the generator was running.  The engine alternators could also be used to charge the batteries during long periods of cruising.  AC power would be created by converting the DC power with a high capacity inverter.

The second method was to use a small AC generator instead of the deep-discharge battery banks to provide the AC power.

It was realized from the first that neither method could supply enough power for the cooking, water heating and air conditioning needs of a Connie.  Therefore, the large 20KW generator which most Connies have would be used for an hour at breakfast, lunch, dinner time and just before evening retirement.  These four periods would provide enough power for battery charging, water heating and cooking.  Air conditioning would also be available at mealtimes.  The concept was that if you had any major power needs they would be met by the four one hour periods of generator operation.  In the interims between these periods modest power needs could be met by the battery banks or the small AC auxiliary generator.

Initially, battery banks received the most attention.  A pair of deep discharge 250 ampere hour (AH) batteries would have a capacity of 500 AH and could be safely discharged to about 250 AH.  This would supply 250 AH at 12 volts over the approximately 5 hour periods between the 20 KW generator operations.  This would be an average power of about 600 watts at 120 volts.  Analysis of the typical needs of a Connie showed that this was adequate to provide off shore power independence provided the owner was reasonably frugal with his power use.

We did a lot of analyses of the costs of both types of systems.  A good battery based system didn’t seem to be possible for much less than $3,000 and its average power capability rather anemic at 300-400 watts.  Diesel auxiliary generators were great but the cost (in excess of $4500) was too high for anyone to stomach.  So by the end of 2011 we were about stagnated.  One type of system had too little power and the other was too expensive.

But in middle January of 2012 I found a type of gasoline powered gennys that seemed to fit the bill.  They produced 2000 watts (4 to 6 times what a battery based system would provide) cost less than $1,000, were quiet (53 dB) and were portable (47 lbs.).

Prior to this point gasoline powered gennys hadn’t even been considered.  There was too much fear of the dangers of gasoline.  But, when we considered that many Connies already carried gasoline powered dinghies, it didn’t seem that gasoline powered gennys would be any worse.  The gennys could be placed on the swim platform where the gasoline vapor danger would be very low. 

The biggest danger is from carbon monoxide fumes.  Theoretically, this generator could fit in a deck box on the bow. But anchored boats trim with their bows into the wind and the exhaust fumes therefore are spewed over the entire boat.  A window or door carelessly left open could fill the entire boat with carbon monoxide fumes.  So the bow isn’t a good location for the genny.  The best location seems to be on the swim platform which is also where the Onan 20 KW generator spews out its fumes.  Since the Onan doesn’t seem to cause any problems the auxiliary genny should work well there too.

Anyway, back in January, cost and performance considered, I decided that for me this was the best route to go.  And I said that I’d buy one in the spring.  However, if I win the lottery, I may buy a diesel powered auxiliary genny.

Having said that I’d buy one in the spring it’s now time to do so and I’m refining my decision about what to buy.  There are about a dozen gennys similar to the Honda EU2000i.  I’ve shown some of them in the able below:

Max

Rated

dB

Wt.

Min $

Max $

Honda EU3000i

3000

2800

144

$1935

$2200

Honda EU2000i

2000

1600

53

47

$940

$1100

Honda EU1000kci

1000

900

37

$850

$850

Generac 2000

2200

2000

*

50

$579

$700

Generac 1600

1650

1600

*

48

$465

$630

Generac 1400

1450

1400

50

$499

$600

Generac 800

850

800

*

28

$319

$480

Powerhouse 2700

2700

2600

92

$700

$1000

Powerhouse 2100

2100

2000

84

$650

$730

Powerhouse 500

500

450

26

$350

$400

Yamaha EF2000iS

2000

1900

51.5

44.1

$990

Yamaha EF1000iS

1000

900

47

27

$792

Honeywell 6066

2200

2000

49.6

$569

Champion

2000

1600

53

49

$750


Selecting generators with a minimum rating in the range of 1600 to 2000 watts and a weight of less than 50 lbs. we get the following table:

Max

Rated

dB

Wt.

Min $

Max $

Yamaha EF2000iS

2000

1900

51.5

44.1

$990

Honda EU2000i

2000

1600

53

47

$940

$1100

Champion

2000

1600

53

49

$750

Generac 2000

2200

2000

*

50

$579

$700

Honeywell 6066

2200

2000

49.6

$569

Generac 1600

1650

1600

*

48

$465

$630

The Yamaha EF2000iS at $990 is the most expensive while the Generac 1600 at $465 is the cheapest at less half the Yamaha’s price.  The Yamaha also has the lowest noise and lightest weight.  But the Honda is not far behind in these characteristics and is slightly less expensive than the Yamaha.

If we compare the power a gas genny can supply to the 600 watts that can be supplied by a bank of deep discharge batteries we find that even the smallest genny in our list (the 800 watt Generac 800 at $319) can supply more power than a deep discharge battery bank; So auxiliary gas gennys become practical at 800 watts.  But for only about $150 more you can get 1600 watts from the Generac 1600 and for $250 more you can get 2000 watts from the Generac 2000.

Except for air conditioning, water heating and galley appliances 2000 watts would supply all your power needs 24/7 and would supply excess power for battery charging.

But after all is said and done, the Honda still appears to be the best, most reliable auxiliary genny.  I’m still thinking of getting a Honda EU2000i

Pete37, 5/30/12



Edited by Pete37 on May 30 2012 at 18:04


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DMark
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Posted: June 07 2012 at 15:51 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Hey Pete,

Want to check in with you on the subject of tank selectors and the emergency cross over switch.  I re-read your write up from the library.  My situation is often a need to balance the tanks because we anchor out overnight and the temps are so warm we need to use the a/c. 

Did all those who ran experiments conclude that the switches do what they are supposed to do or not.  I'm not sure my cross over worked, but that may be unique to me...

Would it ever make sense to switch both tank valves to the aft mains and then turn the cross over to on to force the system to draw fuel down evenly.

Its likely a stupid sophomoric question, but its been on my mind and I had to ask.

Mark



Edited by DMark on June 07 2012 at 15:52


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Captcraw
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Posted: June 08 2012 at 17:17 | IP Logged Quote Captcraw

I have the same question about the tank selector switch and i would like to run off of my aft tanks on long trips to balance trim as the aft tanks empty and finish with the engine saddle tanks is this a good idea.

Elmo

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Pete37
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Posted: June 08 2012 at 19:26 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark & Elmo,

Subject: Fuel Crossover Valves

I think I have an answer to your questions but it will take a day or so to type it up.  Bear with me.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 09 2012 at 12:35


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Pete37
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Posted: June 09 2012 at 12:01 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark & Elmo,

Subject: How the Emergency Crossover Valve Works

Just to refresh your memory, the picture below shows what the Fuel Manifold Valve Panel looks like: 

On the left side is the Port Fuel Valve.  It has three positions; Off, Aft and Port.  The label for “Aft” (to which the valve is presently set) is covered up by the pointer.  It allows the port engine to draw fuel from the port main tank (located under the Master Stateroom bed).  When the valve is moved to the “Port” position fuel is drawn from the port saddle tank (located on the port side of the engine room).  You have probably never used the third position (Off).  It shuts off both the port main and port saddle tanks so that no fuel can be drawn from them.

On the right side is the Starboard Fuel Valve.  It performs the same functions for the starboard main and saddle tanks.

Now the port and starboard engines are connected to the Port and Starboard Fuel Valves respectively.  So if either of these fuel valves were in the "Off" position the engine connected to it would have no source of fuel and could not run.

However, the Emergency Crossover Valve in the center of the panel (when in the “On” position) connects the Port Valve to the Starboard Valve so that with the Port Valve in the “Off” position the port engine can draw fuel from one of the starboard tanks (main or saddle, provided the Starboard Valve is not also in the “Off” position).  Similarly with the Starboard Valve in the “Off” position the starboard engine can draw fuel from one of the port tanks (main or saddle, provided the Port Valve is not also in the “Off” position).

Normally the Emergency Crossover Valve is in the “Off” position.  It is for use only when the tanks normally servicing an engine are dry or are contaminated.  The Emergency Crossover Valve should only be in the “On” position when one (but never two) of the main valves (Port and Starboard) is in the “Off” position.  By proper manipulation of the main valves and the Emergency Crossover Valve one or both engines can draw fuel from any one of the four tanks; Port Main, Port Saddle, Starboard Main or Starboard Saddle.

In spite of this seemingly useful feature, I have never heard of any Connie owner (including myself) using this feature.  Its function isn’t explained anywhere and I don’t think many Connie owners know how it works. 

However, while I cannot guarantee it will work, I see no reason that it will not work.  But when using it be careful that you do not connect to an empty tank.  If you do connect to an empty tank the engines will draw air from the tank which will shut them down and leave you “Dead in the Water”.  And do not use the Emergency Crossover Valve when both of the main valves are connected to a tank.  When used in this condition the amount drawn from each of the connected tanks will depend upon piping resistance in the fuel system and will be indeterminate.

The Gold Shield between the Emergency Crossover Valve and the Starboard Fuel Valve is an historical marker which reads “In 1832 on this Spot Nothing Happened”.  Since my Connie was not even built until 1987 this is probably an accurate statement.  I don’t think it is a standard Connie feature.

Pete37, 6/09/11

PS:  In re-reading your posts I see that both of you want to run with the Emergency Crossover Valve in the "On" position and the Port and Starboard Main Valves set to the port and starboard tanks.  This can be done but there is no guarantee that the amount of fuel drawn from and returned to each tank will be equal.  If you do so, keep a constant eagle eye on the status of your fuel tanks.

I wouldn't worry much about the fuel burned overnight.  Your 20KW Onan at half load (10KW) burns only 1.2 gph.  Even in 12 hours that's only about 15 gallons which is chicken feed on a boat with 600 gallon fuel capacity.



Edited by Pete37 on June 09 2012 at 14:20


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Bellavita3
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Posted: June 09 2012 at 15:33 | IP Logged Quote Bellavita3

Hi Mark and Elmo,

Pete did a good job of describing the function of the emergency cross over valve.  The one thing I'd like to add is this:  This valve is intended for emergency situations ONLY (like a dry or contaminated tank)  Our connies draw large amounts of fuel and trying to run both engines at full RPM through the crossover might create a problem.  Essentially, you would be trying to draw (and return) enough fuel for both engines through one 5/8" hose designed to only feed one engine.  I guess the moral of the story here is;  The crossover valve has a useful function, but you can't really use it to balance the fuel in your tanks from one side to the other.

Hope that helps.
Ron


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Pete37
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Posted: June 10 2012 at 10:37 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Fuel Transfer

Here is a diagram of the fuel system of a Connie.  Not sure all of you have this diagram.  It may help you understand how the system works:

Note that the genny picks up and returns fuel directly to the port aft tank.  The fuel doesnt go through the fuel manifold valves.

I sort of agree with Ron that the Emergency Crossover Valve is just that; a valve that is best used only in emergencies.  You can use it otherwise if you want but don't cry on my shoulder if it it doesn't work as you expect.

Also note that the Emergency Crossover Valve can't add fuel to a tank that is low on fuel.  It can only reduce the rate at which the tank goes dry by using other tanks.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 10 2012 at 10:50


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David Ross
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Posted: June 25 2012 at 18:57 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

I am looking for a a repalcement 60 amp copper cartridge fuse. It is off the aft engine room bulkhead panel board that has various amp fuses enclosed in plastic covers with spares mounted on the board. It is 3/4 " in diameter and 1 3/4 " long with two side mounts. I had to  use the spare and want to replace it.



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Pete37
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Posted: June 25 2012 at 19:59 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Subject:  Fuses

They are called HBO fuses and are made by Bussman.  They are a bit hard to find but I did a check of my records to see who I last got one from. Try

http://livewiresupply.com/fuses/cooper-bussman/HBO-60.html

They usually cost $10 to $15.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 25 2012 at 20:13


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eshover
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Posted: June 25 2012 at 22:03 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Dave - also available here:
http://www.galco.com/buy/Bussmann/HBO-60

Good luck.



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David Ross
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Posted: June 26 2012 at 06:52 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Thanks Pete and Emory, I will order that spare HBO fuse.



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DMark
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Posted: June 26 2012 at 12:38 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete and Ron -

Back on the fuel transfer issue...

I appreciate the background on the "emergency transfer
switch." There seems to be as much known about how it
works as there is unknown. So, I'm running a test. You see
, there isn't much diesel fuel on the Ohio River (in some
cases power is limited as well) and so we need to be
creative, particularly when long trips are involved. I'm
hoping that with the following plan and trade-offs all will go
well. Hopefully one man's "emergency' can be another
man's "fact of life."

Don't fret Pete, I never cry on another man's shoulder...

I'm headed to Portsmouth over the Fourth of July week.
Portsmouth is 120 miles from Cincinnati and there's no diesel
refueling stations between here and there. The only way to
get fuel is to order a truck to meet you at a local marina.
There are only two stops with power and water. I'll be gone
for 6 days. I'll have two nights without power plus distance
run, etc. Net 86.4 gals of diesel from the port aft tank.

When you add it all up its material amount and balancing fuel
consumption becomes an issue on the Ohio river. I rarely
run the boat full out. Most likely will run at +/- 10 knots-ish.
I know that's non-ideal from an engine maintenance POV,
but its a trade off I make. Large boat owners like me on the
river make this trade-off all the time; its common. We all
hear all the warnings, but frankly, rarely see the predicted
maintenance problems. Maybe that's a fresh water benefit,
don't know. That said, I it means wont be stressing the
amount of fuel drawn through the transfer line to the max.

My plan is to start the trip on the forward tanks and take
them down to about 25 gals. Then use the transfer switch
pointed to the aft starboard tank and balance, refuel at a
mid-point on the home-bound leg called Manchester Island
on 7/6, and return home.

I could probably make it without refueling, given that I can
balance, but I refuel as a gesture of thanks to the local
marina owner who helps us however she can.

I'll let you know how it goes.

Best,
Mark

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Pete37
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Posted: June 28 2012 at 17:59 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark,

Subject: Refueling Conundrum

The Emergency Fuel Transfer System (EFTS) does not transfer fuel from one tank to another.  It only allows you to select the tank from which you draw fuel for the main engines. With the transfer valve in the “On” position any one of the four tanks may be selected but the fuel used by the genny is always drawn from and returned to the port aft tank regardless of how the EFTS is set up.

Your 240 mile round trip should take about 24 hours at 10.0 knots and at 14 gph the engine fuel consumption would be 24 x 14 = 336 gallons.  If you use the forward tanks on the way out you would burn only 168 gallons and would have about 16 gallons remaining in each of the forward tanks upon arrival in Portsmouth.  On the way back set the transfer and selector valves so that both engines draw from the starboard aft tank.  You would have about 32 gallons left in it when you get back to Cincinnati. 

During the whole trip no fuel would be taken from the port aft tank by the engines.  But all the fuel used by the genny would come from it.  With about 180 gallons of useable capacity and the genny running at full load (2.1 gph) you should be able to run the genny for about 86 hours (3 days and 14 hours).  At half load (1.2 gph) the time goes up to 150 hours (6 days and 6 hours).  Note that these are the longest times the genny can be run because there is no way (short of refueling) to add fuel to the port aft tank.

This assumes that the transfer valve works as expected.  I would suggest a short test run to see if the fuel transfer valve works.  Record your fuel levels, select the starboard aft tank, set the transfer switch in the “On” position, run for a couple hours and again record the fuel levels in the tanks.  That should determine where the fuel is coming from.

Doing the whole trip with no refueling would be a little tight.  But apparently you have a fuel stop at Manchester Island as an emergency backup.

I run my engines at 1400 rpm most of the time and burn about 14 gph at 10 knots for the same reason you do; to save money. But from an engine lifetime standpoint it’s not a good thing to do and I’ve paid the price (about $6,000) for it by gumming up my turbos with carbon.  It appears that this occurs about every six years.

If you are getting soot on the transom this is a symptom that your turbos are beginning to carbon up.  As time goes on the soot will get worse and eventually the carbon will jam the turbo.  At this point you will have to rebuild the turbo at a cost of about $3,000 (parts and labor) and since with twin engines these things normally occur in pairs expect a $6,000 expense.

Pete37, 6/28/12



Edited by Pete37 on June 28 2012 at 18:00


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DMark
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Posted: June 29 2012 at 11:47 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete,

Thanks for the follow up. Again, I’m only going to run using
the transfer switch until the tanks equilibrate, but I
appreciate the way you looked at an extreme example that
could “stress test” the system. Net I want to prove-out the
idea of using the transfer switch in non-emergency
situations, but don’t need to “go overboard.”

We are also crystal clear on the fact that the genny draws
from the aft starboard tank. That fact is the reason this
problem arises in the first place.

I’ll let you know how this goes.

Best,
M


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eshover
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Posted: June 29 2012 at 12:27 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Approx. price from Diesel Pro:
$1,200 for dry turbo (rebuilt with core exch)
$2,000 for wet turbo (rebuilt with core exch)

Six month warranty.

Emory

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Pete37
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Posted: June 29 2012 at 12:46 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Subject:  Turbo Overhaul Costs

Actually, I paid about $1596 for the turbo rebuild, $257 for miscellaneous parts, $325 for travel and $1125 for labor  That comes to about $3,300 or $6,600 for two turbo replacements.  But if you did two simultaneously rather than one at a time you could probably knock off $600 in travel and labor for a net cost of about $6,000.  It adds up when you include all of the costs and not just the turbos.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 29 2012 at 13:20


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Posts: 2317
Posted: June 29 2012 at 13:38 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark,

Subject:  Equilibrating the Tanks

I keep hearing words to the effect that the transfer valve will equilize the amounts of fuel in the tanks. It won't do that automatically.  You have to do that manually by controlling the times you have the tanks connected to the engines. 

And nothing you do with the transfer switch is going to add fuel to a tank.  It only controls how much fuel you withdraw from a tank.  BTW the genny draws and returns fuel to the port aft tank  as shown in the drawing of June 10th.

Proceeding on the assumption that you can add fuel to a tank could lead to dangerous consequences.

Pete37



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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: June 30 2012 at 17:53 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark,

Subject: Equalizing the Tanks with the Transfer Valve

I thought a lot about what you meant by equalizing the tanks with the transfer valve and concluded that what you meant was that based on simple hydrostatics if two tanks full of liquid are connected by a pipe fluid will flow through the pipe until the level of the fluid in both tanks is equal.  This works if the fluid in at least one of the end of the pipe is at or below the level of the fluid in that tank.  And it will work by siphon even if parts of the pipe are above the level of the fluid.

But the path between the Connie fuel tanks is rather long and the fuel lines are rather small.  So the time for equalization could be quite long and marine fuel tanks often have anti-siphon devices on their fuel lines.  So whether the Connie fuel tanks can be equalized with the transfer valve or not is problematical.

We had a nasty squall line go through Maryland last night with gusts up to 80 mph.  It took down a tree in my neighbor’s yard.  So this morning I went down to the boat to check it out.  Fortunately there was no damage.

But while I was there I decided to test the transfer valve’s equalization capabilities.  At 9:15 my port aft tank had about 38 gallons in it and my starboard aft tank had about 98 gallons.  The reason for the large difference was that I’ve been running the genny quite a bit lately.  Both aft tanks were selected.  I opened the transfer valve.  There was now a path connecting the port and starboard aft tanks.  And the ends of the fuel lines between the tanks were both at the bottom of the tanks.  So fuel should have started flowing between the tanks.  But I came back at 4:05 that afternoon and checked the fuel tank levels.  They hadn’t changed a bit.

The readability of the fuel gauges is about 2 gallons.  If two gallons had moved from the starboard aft tank to the port aft tank I would have been able to detect it.  So in 6 hours and 50 minutes less than 2 gallons had been transferred.   That makes the transfer rate 2.0/6.83 = 0.29 per hour.  Therefore the transfer rate is about 1 quart per hour or less.  It may be zero.  I’m going to check the tanks again in the morning.

My conclusion is that (at least on my boat) hydrostatic transfer of fuel through the transfer valve is one quart per hour or less which is too small to be of any help in cruise planning.

Pete37, 6/30/12



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DMark
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 03 2007
Posts: 131
Posted: June 30 2012 at 22:09 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete,

Poor communication on my part. Please accept apologize for
sending you on a wild goose chase. "Equalization" meant that
I'd run off just the stbd aft tanks for a period that equalized
against the port aft tank.

However, your experiment does make me wonder if I
could run whilst both aft tanks were "live" and connected via
the transfer switch thereby enabling the engines to draw
from them equally...?

What do you think?

Best,

M


Edited by DMark on June 30 2012 at 22:10


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"NANCY CAROLYN" ('86, CC500)
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: June 30 2012 at 22:54 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark,

Yes you could run with both main tanks live but the engines probably wouldn't draw exactly the same amounts from both tanks.  However, that mode doesn't really offer any advantage over running with the transfer valve off.  And it's not good practice to run both engines from the same fuel source.  If you had a contaminated tank it could shut both engines down.

If you really want a transfer capability, two more valves and two more hoses would get you a 70 gph transfer capability at 10 knots.

Pete37



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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 25 2012 at 10:14 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Sticky Shift and Throttle Controls

The shift and throttle controls on your Connie are connected to the engines by Belden Cables.  These are cables consisting of an outer casing which encloses an inner control wire.  “Belden” is the generic name for this type of control.  The cables installed in the 1980s on our Connies were actually made by Morse and are called “Morse Red Jacket” cables because the outer casing has a red jacket.  Since then, Morse has been taken over by Teleflex so you may find them listed as Teleflex cables.

However, in any case, Belden cables don’t last forever.  The interface between the outer housing and inner wire is lubricated during manufacture but eventually the lubrication fails and the cables become sticky.  You will notice this as increasing resistance to making shift and throttle control settings.

One might think that the solution to this problem would be to simply lubricate the ends of the cable with 3in1 or some other type of oil.  The difficulty in implementing this fix is that the sticky area may be many feet from the end of the cable and oil applied at the end of the cable never reaches the problem area.  Further, 3in1 may dilute the factory applied lubricant, making the sticking worse.  Morse and Teleflex both warn against trying to field lubricate their cables.

On my Connie the shift and throttle controls had become progressively more difficult to operate over the years.  By spring of this year the port throttle control was so stiff it could hardly be operated with one hand.  I contemplated two-hand-control but suspected that much pressure, in addition to being a damned nuisance, might damage something in the control mechanisms.  Therefore I concluded it was time to replace the Belden cable.

I inspected the port shift control and found that it went from the FB shift lever to the lower console shift lever via a Belden cable.  It then went from the LC shift lever to the port engine tranny via second Belden cable.  By disconnecting the second Belden cable at the LC shift lever I determined that it was the second Belden cable was the one that was jammed.  The cable from the FB to the LC was working fine.  I suspect that most sticky cable problems, due to the much more hostile engine room environment, are caused by the 2nd cable.

Morse cables are identified by a model number stamped in white letters into the red jacket about 6” from one end of the cable.  That end could either be at the LC or engine room depending on how it was installed.  Physically both ends of the cable are identical.  On my cable the model ID was “Morse D301947-3-192IN-3933”.  Fortunately Red Jacket cables are very common and I found them in the 2012 West Marine catalog on page 642 as Teleflex #CC33216 for $40.  Morse lists it as 192” long while Teleflex calls it 16’; same thing 192”= 16’.  I found the same item in the Hamilton Marine catalog for about $30.

In about a week it arrived and I installed it.  Installation was simple.  It was held to the LC shift control by two screws which had to be loosened.  To get to the shift control mechanism I had to remove the left panel on the LC; 6 screws – no problem. The engine end was held in place by a clamp bolted in place by two very rusty screws.  I had to grind off the old screws with my Dremel grinder; about a half hour job.  Then I pulled the old cable, inserted the new cable in its place and tightened the clamping screws on both ends.  Overall it was a pretty simple job.  The biggest delay was grinding off those old rusty screws.

The new port shift control works very smoothly.  So smooth, that I may replace the slightly sticky throttle control as well.  Beware, not all the control cables are of the same length.  They also may vary from Connie to Connie.  Check the model number before you order.  The critical item, of course, is the length.

Shift and control cables are important safety items.  If a shift or throttle control jams you could crash into a dock or another boat before you could get the engine shut down.

Pete37, 7/242012



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eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: July 25 2012 at 12:09 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Good info on the cables. I have a sticky cable situation
and will require my attention soon.

A while back there was a discussion regarding the size (or
thickness) of the packing material for the shaft packing
gland.

Was the actual size determined? I am going to order the
Gore product. I have used Gore packing in the past and
swear by it.

My port shaft gland is leaking and I tightened it slightly to
stop the leak (at dock). However, the glands have not
been re-packed since I bought the boat, 10-11 years ago!


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