] ]

 
] ] ]
]
Welcome Guest ]
]
] ]

] ] ]
]
Site Navigation ]
]
] ]

] ] ]
]
Top 10 Recent Posts ]
View Last Post 1991 Four Winns 365
Last Post By: Blue Moon 138
Forum: Four Winns

Posted: July 16 2014 at: 17:35

View Last Post Murray Chris Craft Constellations
Pages 1 2 3 4 ... 149 » 150
Last Post By: Capt.Wayne
Forum: Chris Craft

Posted: June 27 2014 at: 16:27

View Last Post Seat Cushions
Last Post By: Michael Acord
Forum: Sea Fox

Posted: June 06 2014 at: 16:02

View Last Post Sail cleanin’ and hull patchin’
Last Post By: dad21dawg
Forum: Hunter

Posted: May 29 2014 at: 16:01

View Last Post 1983 25’ Chris Craft Catalina
Last Post By: fred6963
Forum: Chris Craft

Posted: May 27 2014 at: 14:26

View Last Post 1963 Constellation 42
Last Post By: spellbound
Forum: Chris Craft

Posted: May 06 2014 at: 08:31

View Last Post Viking Yachts Links
Last Post By: Viking44
Forum: Viking Yacht

Posted: April 17 2014 at: 06:32

View Last Post Amerosport 320
Last Post By: Jerry737
Forum: Chris Craft

Posted: April 13 2014 at: 16:00

View Last Post Any Uniflite Owners near Berkeley CA???
Last Post By: concordian
Forum: Uniflite

Posted: March 08 2014 at: 02:27

View Last Post Inverter
Last Post By: eshover
Forum: Chris Craft

Posted: February 03 2014 at: 11:32

]
] ]
   
Chris Craft
 BoatUS Boat Groups/Manufacturer Forums>>Chris Craft
Subject Topic: Murray Chris Craft Constellations Post ReplyPost New Topic
150 Pages « 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 »
] ] ]
]
Author
Message Prev Topic | Next Topic 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: July 22 2011 at 10:02 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Must be my day on the forum!

Recently I posted a query regarding an individual by the
name of Joe Leva.

Here is the follow-on:

This individual posts business cards at West Marine and
other marine related stores. He also goes around to
marinas sticking his fliers on cars.

His business name: Fiberglass & Gelcoat Restoration.

He currently uses the name Joe Leva but has also used the
name Joe Garcia and in Florida has used the name Jose.
He claims to be of Cuban descent and does speak with a
Cuban or Hispanic accent.

HE IS A SCAM ARTIST!!   

He travels the coast and rips off people (dummies like me).
He is very good at what he does. Furnishes a very good
looking contract, phone numbers, business address, etc.

IT IS ALL PHONY!!

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: July 22 2011 at 10:10 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Damn! Hit the send button again.

More on the fiberglass scam artist.

BoatUS has complaints on this guy from Florida to Maryland
and I have since discovered he has "worked" New Jersey
as well.

He will talk a very good line, get you hooked. You will give
him a deposit. You'll sign a contract (while he's cutting into
your boat). He'll work a full day basically screwing up your
boat and you'll never see him again. Sometimes there are
as many as three individuals working this scam

BoatUS is going to help me with contacts needed to file a
complaint with the Maryland AG's office and I will also do
the same in VA and DC where I know he has worked.

I realize that my money is gone. I've beaten myself up
enough regarding my own stupidity and must move on.

I have a fiberglass guy coming Saturday to examine the
damage and (hopefully) will be willing to correct what
someone else has done and make repairs.

Please!! Pass on this info to your yards and fellow boaters!
I simply do not wish to see this happen to more folks.

Sorry for the long post but want everyone to know about
this.

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 22 2011 at 13:53 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

I've learned from experience to never write a post (at least a long one) on the forum.  Prepare the post on Word (or whatever word processor you have) and play with it until you have it the way you want it.  Then copy it and past it into the "Post Reply" window on the forum.  And use a font of at least 11 pts so we can read it without a magnifying glass.

Sorry about your encounter with the "rip off" artist but thanks for warning us about him.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 22 2011 at 14:49 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Oily Bilges

In all the talk we had a week or so ago about how to get the oil out of the forward bilge we never really did talk about how it got there in the first place.  Of course the forward bilge is the lowest part of the boat.  And I know that the oil (and water) trickles down the inside of the engine stringers and eventually dribbles out into the forward bilge compartment.  But Iíve never really been able to track down where it got inside the engine stringers.  Iíve looked at all the obvious limber holes between the hull and the stringers but havenít found the guilty limber hole (or holes) yet.

The engine room catch basins are supposed to catch any liquids (oil or water) which drip from the engines.  The only real source of oil on the boat is the engines and the only place it can really go is into the catch basins.  Yet somehow it is getting out of the catch basins.  The oil we see in the forward bilge isnít diesel fuel.  Itís much more viscous and doesnít have the diesel smell.

So my mode of attack on this problem is to find out how the oil is leaking out of the catch basins.  If I can do that Iíll have oil free bilges.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: July 24 2011 at 18:50 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Hi Pete,

Had a great cruise to Herrington Harbour and looking forward to our next destinations. I am taking a break from the heat and saw your post about your on going bilge mess.

I think you should clean all the bilge area and put absorbant pads around to trace where your oil and water leaks originate. Paper towels work great on the engines where you have connections or gaskets. Wet vac out the stringers through the limber holes with a half inch or so hose attached with an adaptor to the wet vac hose. Once the stringers are dry you can use your finger or paper towel attached to a flexable grabber tool to see where the fluid (as well as the type of fluid) may start or end. I have found leak source a few times this way.

Once you isolate the major leaks and some of minor leaks, it becomes easier to locate the rest. Once everything is dry and painted bright white it will be easy to spot a leak, know what the leak is by sight, odor or taste (taste works well for salt versus fresh water, not so good for head leaks) and where it is comming from.

Of course the obvious must be done first, like making sure the rudders don't leak and the shaft drips are under control. 3M commercial sponges are great for containing leaks as you check out the various leaks. Just get to it already and be done with it. IT IS A SAFETY ISSUE NOT TO HAVE A CLEAN DRY BILGE!!!  Not to mention no more odor or mess and you will have great satisfaction from your effort when you have completed the task. Then you will be able to find a future leak rather easily.

Coinicidently, yesterday while doing an engine room check, I saw some clear and hot water under the fresh water pump deck. The source was a leaking hot water line under the galley sink. It was just  about ready to completely break apart. It was located and repaired in twenty minutes. Would have been a differant story with multi-fluid messy bilge areas. This is also why I only use the fresh water tank on board and not dockside water.   



__________________
DAVE
GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
Back to Top Printable version View David Ross's Profile Search for other posts by David Ross
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 24 2011 at 21:32 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

The first thing to do is to eliminate the water from the shaft logs that gets into the catch basins under the engines.  The way my boat is set up the shaft logs drip right into the catch basins.  You can reduce the drippage by tightening the shaft logs but you cant eliminate it.  I'm going to get some Gore Tex and repack the shaft logs.  That will help but I still won't have a dry bilge.

As far as I can tell I have no water leaks other than the engine shaft logs and a very small amount from the rudder shafts. The fresh water system is tight as a drum and all the thru hulls are in good shape.

I'm not concerened about small amount of oil that drips from the engines into the catch basins.  As long as that oil stays in the catch basins it can easily be cleaned up.  But when it gets out into the bilge it messes up the whole boat.

Once I have the shaft log drippage diverted away from the catch basins,  I'll fill the basins with water containing a fluorescent dye and look for leaks with an ultraviolet lamp.

But before you can clean anything up you've got to achieve a dry bilge.  I'm not  there yet.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 24 2011 at 21:49


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 25 2011 at 21:10 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Stuffing Boxes & Such

I took some pictures of my stuffing boxes yesterday because Iím planning to do some work on them.  One of those photos is shown below:

After taking the pictures I wondered whether I could identify the manufacturer and model number of the stuffing box.  As you can see there are no labels on it and it is at least 25 years old.  It sort of looks like rusty steel but itís actually cast bronze.  A little searching on the web showed that Buck Algonquin made stuffing boxes that sort of looked like it.  So I went to their web site:

www.buckalgonquin.com

I found that they had a catalog (#108) that showed all of their products.  And in it on page 33 I found that my shaft log is model 00pb250ghn.  They not only have the stuffing box, they also have spare parts and accessories for it.

I looked around in their catalog and found all kinds of parts that are used on Connies.  If its metal there is a better than even chance that Buck Algonquin made it.  Need a new chrome hinge for that side hand rail?  Buck has it.  Need parts for your rudder assemblies?  Buck has them.  Apparently Buck was one of the major suppliers for the metal parts used on Connies.  And since we are all Connie owners, who are constantly looking for spare parts we should all have their catalog.

Fortunately itís a free download from Buckís site.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 25 2011 at 21:16


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 26 2011 at 22:12 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Stuffing Box Leakage

I bought some GTU Gore Shaft Packing for my main engine stuffing boxes today.  Iím going to repack my stuffing boxes to minimize the leakage and amount of water in my bilge.  Now everyone knows that there should always be some stuffing box leakage.  If you run them completely dry they will burn up.  They need some water to lubricate the packing.  Surveyors had always told me that there should be a few drops of water per minute to lubricate the shaft.  But they werenít very specific.

So I looked on the web and found instructions for installing Gore Tex packing.  They said 8 to 10 drops per minute per inch of shaft diameter.  The shafts are 2.5Ē in diameter so I should see 20 drops per minute.  And there are two engines so the leakage should be 40 drops per minute.  And there are 1440 minutes per day so thatís 57,600 drops per day.

A little more research on the web indicated that the average water droplet from a faucet is 5E-5 gallons.  Naturally thereís some variation but weíre only looking for an approximate answer.  So the leakage is

57,600 x 0.00005 = 2.88 gallons per day

Now that means that if I let the stuffing box leak into the catch basins under the engines Iím going to have 1.44 gallons of water sloshing around in each catch basin along with whatever oil drips off the engine.  And if I run the engines it will probably be considerably more.

This is why my next task is to divert the stuffing box drippage away from the engine catch basins.  In the photo below the stuffing box has been backed off so that a real stream of water flows from it.

As you can see the drippage from the stuffing box falls directly on the divider between the engine catch basin part of the bilge (to the left) and the rest of the bilge (to the right).

About half of the water goes to the left and half to the right.  My plan is to mount a piece of 3/4" plywood on top of the divider and fasten it down so that it slopes downward aft (to the right).  This will divert the drippage away from the engine catch basin.  Later I may replace this diverter with a stainless steel plate.

Note the pronounced iron stains in the bilge.  This is not from engine rust.  The water in the bay has large amounts of iron in it and anywhere that water flows over the hull it gets that orange stain.  While I'm at it I'll use some On-N-Off or muriatic acid to get rid of the stains.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 26 2011 at 22:25


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Bennett
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 121
Posted: July 26 2011 at 22:45 | IP Logged Quote Bennett

Stuffing Box:

I used Johnson Duramax Ultra x - no real leakage and no
high temps.

http://www.europeanmarine.co.uk/Duramax%20Ultra-
X%20Compression%20Packing.pdf

Pete- I think you need to look at your band clamps on the
shaft log's hose; it looks like it is about to rust through. I
changed all my clamps including the ones on both sides of
the bulkhead.

BTW - sinking would likely occur if the shaft log rubber
hose came off due to a failed clamp and or over tightened
packing.

Bennett

__________________
Christine 1986 Chris Craft 500
Back to Top Printable version View Bennett's Profile Search for other posts by Bennett
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 27 2011 at 20:34 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Bennett,

Subject: Stuffing Box

I bought some GTU stuffing yesterday but I guess I can return it.  The link you posted for Johnson Duramax didnít work but found it by searching under ďJohnson Duramax Ultra-XĒ.  Unfortunately, itís not available locally so Iíll have to buy it from a company named Hamilton Marine in Maine.  Shipping will take about a week and if thereís anything wrong with it (like the size) Iíll have to ship it back.  I donít like working with these small mail order outfits.  It took three tries to even get through to a salesperson.

Iím pretty sure my stuffing box is a Buck Algonquin 00pb250ghn unit but Iím basing that on the similarity between what I have in photos and whatís in their catalog.  The catalog says the packing is ľĒ but if it isnít Iíll have to ship it back and get a replacement.  The whole process; ordering it, checking it, shipping it back to them (if necessary) and then getting back the right part could take a month.  So a one day job with two trips to the local West Marine store might take a month.  The obvious answer is to take the stuffing box apart, measure the packing size and then reassemble it.

Iím aware of the danger of sinking that would occur if the shaft log rubber hose came off.  Iíve replaced those clamps before but perhaps itís time to do it again.  They are a bit rusty but they are stainless steel so I doubt they have reached the point of breaking.  However, Iíll inspect them today and since they only cost about $2.20 apiece Iíll replace them all for a whopping expenditure of $17.60 plus tax; nothingís too good for my Connie.

I donít know what you mean by ďon both sides of the bulkheadĒ.  There isnít any bulkhead aft of the engine until you get to the aft engine room bulkhead.  The picture below shows that all four of my hose clamps are located forward of the aft engine bulkhead:

But perhaps your setup places the stuffing box further aft which would push the second pair of hose clamps into that mysterious compartment aft of the engine room.  That must be somewhere under the office (or in my boat the guest stateroom).

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 27 2011 at 20:53


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Bennett
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 121
Posted: July 27 2011 at 21:06 | IP Logged Quote Bennett

Hi Pete,

Sorry, but I can't remember the size I ordered, I measured
the shaft and the bore with a caliper before I ordered and it
fit fine (I have it written in my notes at the boat....sorry).
My marina orders from Paxton (wholesale only) and I got it
in a day.

There is a rubber tubing in the engine room (your picture)
and directly on the other side of the bulkhead. If you pull
up the access ports (one at the bottom of the stairs and
one under the middle stateroom/or office sofa) you will see
the second rubber tubing.

I discovered once, that when I put a lot of torque on the
stuffing box nuts, that I could actually spin the rubber tube
against the fiberglass tube. I tried to tighten the band
clamps but, due to their age, I just could not get them tight
enough (one of the two clamps in the engine room had
corroded through one side of the band, but the bands in the
state room just would not adjust - BTW, this type of band is
typically 304 SS - which will rust and corrode, 316 SS
would be much better, but not typical for this type). Long
story short.....with new bands, I stopped any spinning.

Bennett

__________________
Christine 1986 Chris Craft 500
Back to Top Printable version View Bennett's Profile Search for other posts by Bennett
 
Bennett
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 121
Posted: July 27 2011 at 21:19 | IP Logged Quote Bennett

Qualifier to my previous post....I responded about the
second
rubber tubing after reading your post on my email and w/o
looking at your picture on the forum. My boat's
arrangement
may be different than yours - I do not have such a large
opening through the bulkhead as you?

In any case, I have the shaft log connected as follows: log
to
rubber tube, to fiberglass intermediate tube, to rubber tube
and finally to a fiberglass tube glassed into the hull.

Bennett

PS: Your band clamps look much better in this picture!

Edited by Bennett on July 27 2011 at 21:21


__________________
Christine 1986 Chris Craft 500
Back to Top Printable version View Bennett's Profile Search for other posts by Bennett
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 28 2011 at 17:08 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Bennett & All

Subject:  Stuffing Box Clamps

Finding out (based on your last post) that I had 16 stuffing box clamps to replace rather than 8, I hustled over to West Marine this morning and cleaned out their remaining stock of #72 hose clamps.  The picture below shows the second stuffing box hose on the port engine and its four clamps.

Itís located in a compartment under the lower companionway and is accessed through a hatch at the entrance to the guest head.  The flash that took this picture is probably the first light this compartment has seen since the boat was built 25 years ago.  When I find one of these hidden compartments, I sort of feel like an archeologist opening a hidden chamber in a pharaohís tomb.  There arenít many more hidden compartments to find.

In order to get at the stuffing box tube you first have to remove the shower sump pump for the guest head.  The compartment was surprisingly clean and dry.  I found the hose clamps in the compartment to all be in excellent condition.  Apparently because the compartment is dry the clamps donít rust or corrode.  In this picture you are looking forward along the port engine shaft.  The white blotch at the bottom of the picture is the nipple on the top of the shaft alley through which the shaft enters the boat.  And at the top you can see the aft side of the aft engine bulkhead and the hole through which the shaft enters this compartment.

I didnít take a shot of the starboard stuffing box tube and its compartment but it looks pretty much the same as this picture.  The compartment is accessed through a hatch in the den floor.

In spite of the fact that some of the hose clamps seem to be in fine condition Iím replacing them all.  At $2.29 each theyíre cheap insurance.  So far Iíve replaced 11.  The remaining 5 are on order at West Marine.  In the process of removing the old clamps, two clamps broke and five were found to be in questionable condition. The nine old hose clamps that are in good condition will be used as spares.

Why am I so concerned about stuffing box hose clamps?  Because, as Bennett said, a rusty clamp can break and sink your boat.  And it will probably sink your boat before you can even find out where the leak is.  I found about half of my clamps in questionable condition and two actually broke when I tried to remove them.  They should be replaced about every 10 years.  How long has it been since you replaced your stuffing box clamps?

Pete37, 7/28/11



Edited by Pete37 on July 28 2011 at 18:09


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 28 2011 at 18:30 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Subject: Messy Bilge

I've tightened up the stuffing boxes a bit which has reduced the water flow into the the catch basins under the engines.  And now I can see that there is oil but no water in the port catch basin.  This means that the port engine is the source of the oil in the bilge; or at least most of it.

Don't know what's leaking yet but at least I know which engine it's coming from.  And since the boat hasn't been run for a while I know that it's a stationary leak rather than one that occurs when the engines are run. That's progress.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 28 2011 at 18:40


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: July 29 2011 at 18:19 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Arrived in Annapolis this afternoon from Cambridge (will leave Sunday am). Thank goodness for the air conditioned lower helm!! So far so good; dry bilges and no soot. The new fuel tank switch-over valves are working out but have noticed they turn easier when I change tanks, when needed, while we have been cruising compared to when trying to turn them at the slip when the engines have not been on. Maybe running somehow lubricates better or fuel temperture changes tolerance in the fitting. Will need more tank changing while running and at the slip to get better input.

Pete, glad you got started in the direction of a dry, spotless bilge.You'll become an expert on how liquids flow from area "a" to area "b". Only trouble is they sometimes run from "c", "d", "e" to get to "b".



__________________
DAVE
GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
Back to Top Printable version View David Ross's Profile Search for other posts by David Ross
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 29 2011 at 19:30 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Have you noticed that the site is very sluggish and that sometimes the site address can't be found?

Next step on the clean bilge project is to flush all the oil out of the port engine catch basin.  Then I'll have to dry out the basin. And finally, Ill spread out some newspaper in the catch basin to see where the oil is comng from.

Maybe I'll get all that done this weekend.  Glad your trip was a success.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 30 2011 at 16:03


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: July 30 2011 at 15:17 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Hi Pete and all,

At times this site has been slow or not up but usually ok. Tried a larger font size for this post, seems fine. Yesterday when I sent a post the site was slow and wasn't sure the post was sent, but see it did go through.



__________________
DAVE
GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
Back to Top Printable version View David Ross's Profile Search for other posts by David Ross
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 30 2011 at 16:16 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Bennett,

Subject:  Stuffing Box Clamps

Finished the last of the 16 clamps today.  Job took about 4 hours with a lot of it on a few clamps that were in awkward positions.  Altogether, there were 3 clamps out of 16 (about 19%) that broke when I tried to remove them. One clamp was of the wrong type and shouldn't have been used for a shaft log.  That makes 25% defective.  Several more were questionable.  But all were replaced.  The ones that seemed in pretty good shape were kept as spares.

Thanks for the tip on the stuffing box clamps.  It may have prevented an accident.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: July 31 2011 at 10:34 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Sadly, I took Southern Charm out to finally get some fresh
fuel. Ran her up full load for a short period, than throttled
back to about 1950, turned around and headed for
Naptown for fuel. Put her back up for a brief few minutes to
ensure a good "blowing up" oops!, I meant, "blowing out".
Took on fuel and added Diesel Kleen. Coming back to Mill
Creek she was running wonderfully and reasonably clean. I
pulled into my dock and the port engine was exhibiting
either steam or white smoke. I kinda' discounted steam
because I did not notice the "sweet" smell of glycol. But not
sure yet. Got up this morning and checked the oil. The oil is
not muddy and looks normal to me. I guess that's a good
thing, right? However, the bad news is I see what appears
to be antifreeze and oil under my engine. I already have a
bad rear seal and it is bad when under full load, so the oil
could be from the flywheel spraying oil out of the holes
where motor mounts would normally be installed for road
use. The color of the smoke is white and constant. Did not
exhibit this until I arrived at the dock and brought the
engine to idle which, of course, reduces engine pressures
and may allow a water or coolant leak to produce steam. I
am having difficulty determining if it is smoke or steam. I
may spin the engine over with my finger on the stop button
to ensure if any coolant or water is in the cylinders it will
blow out, then start the engine cold and see what happens.
Any thoughts? Seems like it one thing after the other with
the boat. :(

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 31 2011 at 12:28 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Sorry to hear of your problems.  Did you notice what temps she was running at?  I guess you did but you didn't say anything about it which would mean the temps were OK.  And I guess your oil pressure was OK too since you didn't say anything about it.

According to the "Exhaust Smoke Analysis" in the Detroit Service Manual misfiring cylinders or the bypass blower valve piston stuck open could be the problem.  And of course overheating would be a possibility but you didn't mention high temps.

Here is a table from Marine Diesel Engines which gives possible reasons for white smoke.  The one that would scare me is the "blown head gasket".  But another "dirty fuel" is a definite possibility since you just fueled up.  There could have been some water in the fuel.  I once got about 30 gallons of water from a fuel dock.  It can happen at even the most reputable fuel docks. Check the Racors.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 31 2011 at 13:16


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: July 31 2011 at 21:40 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Pete - there's a lot more there that scares me other than
the blown head gasket. I've replaced a head gasket, but
the other items mentioned are reasons to tear down the
engine. Not a good thing. What is disheartening is, this is
the engine that was (supposedly) rebuilt prior to my buying
the boat. The starboard is original and is still going strong.
RE: temps, something weird appeared there as well, when
I entered my slip, I noted the temperature on the port
engine was a lot cooler than the starboard. How could that
be? I have no coolant in the expansion tank. I know that I
lost antifreeze in the bilge but do not know quite how much
was lost. I will work on this tomorrow and add antifreeze
and see how much was lost. I have a bad tank fitting on
the cap and I know that I will lose some coolant when I run
the boat hard.
I also have (if I can find them) some oil sample test sheets
that I bought some time ago. No matter how accurate they
are, if they will simply show whether or not coolant is in the
oil. However, I did not smell coolant in the oil and the oil
level did not appear high, but will check again in the
morning.
My plan: add coolant, check oil again to determine if
anything is leaking back into the oil pan. I will start the
engine. If I no smoke then what I saw was steam. If
white smoke is immediate than that helps me determine
the problem.
I am simply very tired of this damned port engine causing
me to simply lose heart in boating and being on the water
in general. I went from a high to a very low in a matter of
a couple of hours.



__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
Bennett
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 121
Posted: July 31 2011 at 22:21 | IP Logged Quote Bennett

Emory,

Sorry that you are having problems. One thing that could
be happening is that when you are sufficiently low on
coolant, the temperature reading could be incorrect and the
indicated temperature reading much lower than actual due
to the lack of coolant against the sensor, i.e., if there were
only air/vapor on the sensor, the sensor would be
indicating the temperature at the location of the sensor and
not the temperature of the engine.....meaning that the
engine could be very hot.

Bennett



__________________
Christine 1986 Chris Craft 500
Back to Top Printable version View Bennett's Profile Search for other posts by Bennett
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: July 31 2011 at 22:46 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Your loss of coolant and white smoke could mean overheating due to loss of coolant and that  the white smoke was really steam.  Could be something as simple as a blown rubber cooling hose somewhere on the engine. How long has it been since you replaced the hoses? 

If you found the antifreeze in your cooling system low and an indication of antifreeze in the bilge you've got a leak in your cooling system.  And the most common cause of this is blown cooling system hoses.  When you start the engine up look for leaks.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on July 31 2011 at 23:38


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Delaware Jim
"Navigator"




Joined: December 27 2006
Posts: 381
Posted: August 01 2011 at 12:21 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Emory,

I had a coolant hose to the exhaust manifold break a clamp and lost coolant into the bilge.  I did notice the white smoke while idling and them checked the temps, which were pretty hot... my repair was just a couple of new clamps and refill the FW cooling system.  I will be changing out all the coolant hoses this winter.

I hope your situation is as easy to identify and repair as mine was.

Jim

 

 



__________________
"Still In the Mood"
1985 Chris Craft 500 Constellation
Back to Top Printable version View Delaware Jim's Profile Search for other posts by Delaware Jim
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 01 2011 at 16:33 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Ok - coolant tank is/was dry. Much coolant blew out or
leaked out. I added coolant, approx. 3 gallons. Started
engine and no smoke/steam. I suspect that what I may
have seen was steam, however, the telltale sign of glycol
(odor) was not present. Could the steam be from the
another source on the F/W side? Either that or my sniffer
ain't what it used to be. Oil level appears ok and no odor
of coolant in oil. Color is typical DD black, no bubbles, no
color change.

I believe Bennett was correct in his analysis. No coolant in
tank, errant gauge reading, engine was, in fact,
overheating and causing some steam. I don't know that I
got it hot enough to damage anything but am keeping my
fingers crossed.

The water stream from the port engine appears weak.
They've been in the boat for three seasons. Time for a
change anyway.

So I have been in the engine room attempting to change
out an extraordinarily stubborn impeller. And yes, I have
the Jabsco puller and it won't budge! No matter how tight I
tighten the damned dogs, the impeller won't come out.
Any hints or tricks I don't know about?? It came out about
1/4" and that's it!

I want to change out the impeller and fire up the engine,
warm up the oil and pull a sample for analysis. Then I
intend on changing the oil and filters, fuel filters, etc.

The fire up again to determine if I have a leak somewhere
in the hose system or other.

If anyone has a trick to give me on the impeller removal, I
would appreciate it. Jabsco does make a more expensive
impeller remover which is not normally stocked. WM said
one of their CA stores has one (according to computer) and
he will try to confirm and have it shipped to the Naptown
store overnight. Darn thing is over $100!

Thanks to all who responded, your advice is always
appreciated.


__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 01 2011 at 16:36 | IP Logged Quote eshover

WM just called me and the other puller is spoken for. Jabsco
is notoriously slow in shipping out to folks. I'll just keep
bangin' my head against the bulkhead!

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 01 2011 at 18:02 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Ok - took a break and knocked back a 1/2 bottle of Pino.
Made another stab at the impeller, with the help of a spray
or two of PB Blaster on the shaft and out she finally came!
Never had this much trouble before.

I noticed a little scratch (not too severe looking) on the
inside of the housing on the right side. The blades of my
impeller have definitely taken a "set" and the blades at the
rear appeared as though something (shell?) had gotten in
there and chewed a little bit of the impeller end off, very
slight though, but maybe enough to affect water flow
somewhat. No missing blades.

Can I dress the scratch with a fine grade sanding paper?
Or should I leave it alone.

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
LPLikas
"Seaman Recruit"




Joined: May 30 2010
Posts: 10
Posted: August 01 2011 at 18:54 | IP Logged Quote LPLikas

I have some experience with stubborn impellers.
You may want to jog the engine a bit without starting.
Sometimes the impeller position prevents removal.
Len



__________________
Emerald Odyssey
Chris Craft Constellation 460
Solomons Island, Maryland
Back to Top Printable version View LPLikas's Profile Search for other posts by LPLikas
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 01 2011 at 22:39 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Thanks Len. To all: installed new impeller and water flow is
excellent.
Think I may have a blown head gasket. Here's why; at the
behest of a couple of Western Branch mechanics, I
diverted my air box tubes from the oil pan to a puke
bottle. After installing the new impeller, I decided to look
around the engine for any signs of coolant leaks. As I said,
I have quite a bit of coolant lying in the catch basin under
the engine. The puke bottle had overturned and the hoses
had come out of the bottle from air pressure. They were
bubbling air in the coolant under the engine. I removed
the left bank hose and wiped it off and watched it closely,
nothing but air.
However, when I examined the right bank, liquid is pouring
out! I didn't think an engine could start so well and purr
along at idle with a blown head gasket. Or maybe I'm
wrong. Could it be a cracked head? I hope not. The
engine was fairly cold and I would not think a cracked head
could immediately produce that much fluid.

At any rate, if it is only a head gasket, I'm a lucky son-of-
gun. I have the tubes and fitting to move the starboard
engine air box drains from the oil pan but have never
gotten around to it (I damned sure will now). If I had
never re-routed these drain hoses, my port engine oil pan
would be full of glycol right now and my engine would
effectively be destroyed!

Any thoughts on my predicament?


__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
TStellato
"Deckhand"




Joined: August 12 2007
Posts: 206
Posted: August 01 2011 at 23:20 | IP Logged Quote TStellato


Em,

Hope things get better and you are able to enjoy some boating this season.  Glad you at least got the dinghy up and running again.  We have found with the hot weather we are waiting until late in the evening to get out and run to town or just to take a putt up the creek.

I know that you are much more adapt at fixing your engines than we are, so I know that you will get this all fixed.

Vicki


__________________
Tony and Vicki
FIVE STAR
1985 Constellation
Back to Top Printable version View TStellato's Profile Search for other posts by TStellato
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: August 02 2011 at 00:25 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

To All Who Have Jabsco Impeller Removers:

The remover uses thumb screws to tighten against the impeller.  I've had mine for many years and have found from experience that that you just can't tighten the remover by hand enough to get the impeller out.  I use an adjustable end wrench tightened against the thumb screws to get better leverage.  With more leverage you get a good bite on the impeller and it comes out easily.  

Unfortunately, the remover isn't terribly strong so be a little careful about tightening the screws.  Tighten just enough to get the impeller out.

Every Connie should have one of these removers,  It's the only reliable way to get the impellers out.

All of the Jabsco stuff seems to come from the Orient.  I just ordered a replacement handle for a Jabsco diverter valve.  It took six weeks.  I guess most of that time was for shipment on a slow freighter across the Pacific.  If you want an impeller puller order it now before you need it. Depco Pump Company (800) 446-1656 probably has them.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: August 02 2011 at 00:39 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Unfortunately you have a "chicken and egg" situation.  Did low water in the cooling system cause the engine to overheat and blow the head gasket (or crack the head)?  Or did the blown head gasket cause the low water, overheating and possible cracked head?

Not much you can do about it now; it is what it is.  But it's a great advertisement for the engine alarm systems that warn of low oil pressure or high temps.  I blew a hose on the cooling system a few years back and the warning system gave me quick warning that prevented any damage to the engine.  I'm a gauge watcher by nature but you can always be distracted and miss an overheating engine.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 03 2011 at 11:56 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Well, when I do it, I do it right. I cooked the engine. Tom
Hug on board and tearing down the engine. Needs new
liner kits, heads, etc. Will replace all injectors while we're
there.
Kits for 6V92's are now $450 per hole. plus labor, plus,
plus. You know how it goes. Tom has just finished a 8V92
Hatt and has a good handle on what the costs will be.
Hopefully the crank is ok. It's going to be an added
expensive, but the rear seal starting leaking several years
ago and slings oil out the motor mount holes. I'm
constantly mopping up oil and cannot keep the engine
room clean, plus it eventually fouls my air filters. So, am
having Tom replace the rear seal. Got to jack up the
engine, slide the tranny back and drop the crank.
That brings me to an important question: does anyone
know if there is enough room between the prop and rudder
to allow the tranny space to slide back 3"-4"??
If not, I'm looking at my diver pulling the prop off.

Folks, so far this season, I've been scammed by a
fiberglass crook, had to replace the outboard on the
whaler, replace the upper salon A/C and now this!! Plus,
I've hired another glass guy to fix what the scammer
screwed up. :( I've about had it with this BIG boat
nonsense!

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 03 2011 at 12:01 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Speaking of air conditioning. Right now, I cannot say
enough about the unit I bought. It's built by a young
company called Marinair (no, not a misspelling).   They are
located in Miami.

The unit I purchased was a 14,000 btu, has built-in vacuum
and pressure gauges, SS drip pan, sound cover on the
compressor and well insulated blower motor. The
compressor is a rotary.

Folks, this unit is as close to a split-system as you can get!
It is so quite, you cannot hear the compressor...period!
You really don't hear the blower. You only hear the
whooosh of air coming out the vent.

The price was somewhat lower than Marine or Cruise Air.

Comes with a digital stat and a hand-held remote control.
That really nice. Now I don't have to get up off the sofa
and walk 3 feet to the thermostat. :)

Just thought I would pass it on.

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: August 03 2011 at 14:24 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Sorry to hear of your problems.  I checked my photo library and came up with the following prop picture:

The prop is 30" in diameter and measures 5.8" on the original picture.  The space between the prop and the rudder is 1.1" on the original picture.  So scaling the space is (30/5.8) x 1.1 = 5.58".  So it looks like you have at least 5" to pull your prop back.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on August 03 2011 at 14:37


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
eshover
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2011
Posts: 205
Posted: August 03 2011 at 14:36 | IP Logged Quote eshover

Pete - do you think I can increase the distance by turning
the rudder hard to port or starboard?

Tom needs about 3" - 4" distance between the bell housing
and block in order to remove the flywheel.

All this for the 30 minutes it takes to remove and install a
seal!

I assume that if the prop is removed the shaft will pass by
the rudder?

Thanks,
Emory

__________________
"Southern Charm"
1986 Connie 500
Back to Top Printable version View eshover's Profile Search for other posts by eshover
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: August 03 2011 at 14:43 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Unfortunately, the pivot point for the rudder is near the front of the rudder so you won't pick up a lot but you would probably have 7" clearance.  The rudders turn less than 45 degrees.

I think we have a Connie in the yard.  I'll go over and see if I can make some measurements.

Pete37



__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: August 03 2011 at 15:07 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Emory,

Sorry, a month ago we had 3 Connies in the yard. Now there are none.  I'll look and see what other pictures I have.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on August 03 2011 at 16:04


__________________
INTERLUDE
A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
Back to Top Printable version View Pete37's Profile Search for other posts by Pete37
 
Fantasy
"Navigator"




Joined: November 30 2006
Posts: 324
Posted: August 03 2011 at 16:38 | IP Logged Quote Fantasy

Emory,

I've done that job in the water without removing the prop on my 460.  You should be able to get the space you need on your 500, but will probably need to move the engine forward to remove the flywheel.  The hardest part was getting the very heavy flywheel back on and in the right position but it can be done.  You might even have more room than I did.

John



__________________
"Fantasy"
460 Chris Craft Constellation
Back to Top Printable version View Fantasy's Profile Search for other posts by Fantasy
 
Bennett
"Deckhand"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 121
Posted: August 03 2011 at 17:00 | IP Logged Quote Bennett

omit

Edited by Bennett on August 03 2011 at 17:05


__________________
Christine 1986 Chris Craft 500
Back to Top Printable version View Bennett's Profile Search for other posts by Bennett
 
]
] ]
150 Pages « 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 »

  Post ReplyPost New Topic

] ] ]
]
  ]
Printable version Printable version
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
]
] ]

] ] ]
]
©2014, Boat Owners Association of The United States. All Rights Reserved.
This page was generated in 4.4072 seconds.
]
] ]