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David Ross
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Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: May 28 2011 at 23:10 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete, I read that article also. Interesting. Hopefully the economy picks up, more jobs are created and the glut of used boats and homes will result in prices going up. What ever my boat is worth in this market, today it was priceless! A great cruise to Baltimore Inner Harbor for the Memorial Day week end. All the kids and grandkids on board. Everyone in bed now except me. Enjoying a drink on the flybridge overlooking the city water front.......

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GOOD SPIRITS
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Fly Bridge
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Joined: April 17 2011
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Posted: May 28 2011 at 23:16 | IP Logged Quote Fly Bridge

Cap'n Ross:   Glad you have things under control!!  I seen your Post.  I am on the Catalina forum.  I presently have boat on the "hard.  Just thought I would send a message, and wish you well, "enjoying the stars, on the Flybridge"!!

Signed:  Fly Bridge (Catalina owner). 



Edited by Fly Bridge on May 28 2011 at 23:19


__________________
1979 Chris Craft,Catalina Sedan FB, 33ft. 2 Helms, 2/5.7. New 2004. Port eng. removed to rebuild. Starboard operating. Presently in "Backyard Dry Dock". Home Port:Holiday,Florida. (danbushey@msn.com)
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Pete37
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Posted: May 29 2011 at 11:46 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave & All,

There isn't much we can do about the boating aspects of the economy.  All we can do is wait and watch and vote according to who we think will improve the economy.  But I think it's useful to know what's going on.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on May 29 2011 at 11:48


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A Murray Chris Craft Constellation 500
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TStellato
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Joined: August 12 2007
Posts: 206
Posted: May 29 2011 at 23:19 | IP Logged Quote TStellato


I agree with Dave,

Tony and I are only going to leave this boat when they have to hoist us off and put us in the wheelchair!  So to us it does not matter so much since we are never going to sell.  Sorta in line with the discussion.  There was an article in the Annapolis Capital about used cars and the fact that a local Edgewater dealer even has a sign up that he does not have any used cars under $3K.  With people hanging onto their cars longer and not buying new ever 2-3 years, it has made the used car market go up.  Perhaps the same will eventually happen for boats.

We had a beautiful day on Mill Creek and are now at anchor for a peaceful night!  Short trip for us, but as Dave said priceless!  Anchored with 2 friends along side and brought the dinghy.  The water was like bath water and had a great cookout.  Could not ask for a better Memorial weekend, especially since normally it is cold and/or rainy in this area.


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Pete37
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Posted: May 30 2011 at 09:13 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

We all think, hope, we are going to keep our Connies forever.  But as we get older there will come a point where we are too decrepit to operate and maintain our boats. At that point you have to part with them. Fantasy's of keeping our Connies forever are pleasant to ponder but unfortunately we have to be prepared for reality.

However, in the meantime, go ahead and fantasize.

Pete37



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Delaware Jim
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Joined: December 27 2006
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Posted: June 02 2011 at 08:39 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

All,

Marie and I are settling into the Florida routine, but I appear to have an issue growing (pardon the pun) as the discharge water stream from the 5 AC water discharges has slowed notably.  I am cleaning the strainer every 7-10 days or so (really full of growth).

I seem to remember someone saying the lines need to be flushed periodically to keep them clean as well.  Bleach solution will kill active organic growths, but if any barnacles are in the lines, I was told to use a mild muratic acid solution to dissolve the shells.

As I will need to do this within the next few weeks, are there any  forum members who has done this task??  I'd like some direction on how to approach this task, please.

Thanks

Jim 

 

 



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Grey Goose
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Joined: October 25 2009
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Posted: June 02 2011 at 12:59 | IP Logged Quote Grey Goose

Does anyone know the manufacture of the windows? I am
looking for new gaskets/outer seals for the windshield and
the forward superstructure windows.

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1987 Chris Craft 501
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Pete37
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Posted: June 02 2011 at 15:41 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Allen, 

The side windows were made by Aluminum 2000. They have a site at

www.aluminum2000.com

The windows were actually Hehr Series 7000 sliding windows.  They were shown in an older version of American2000's web site but don't seem to be shown now.  I have copies of the old drawings.

But they no longer make the windshields.  They have transferred them to American Marine at

www.americanmarine.com

 

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 03 2011 at 00:04


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Pete37
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Posted: June 03 2011 at 00:24 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

I haven't had to clean the AC lines but if I had to I'd put some 30% muriatic in a plastic bucket.  Detach the AC pump input hose and dunk it in the acid. Then turn on the AC and pump the acid through the lines. 

Problem is that I don't think it would be very effective because the acid wouldn't stay in the lines very long before it was pumped overside.  After pumping the acid follow up with a water rinse for a few minutes.

The input hose to the AC pump is rather awkward to remove so you would probably want to make some sort of T valve arrangement to make pumping the acid easier. One of those Y valves used for heads might work.

This is the sort of question that some Florida native really needs to answer.  It will be interesting to see what they have to say.

Be careful with the acid.  It's not real bad stuff but it deserves respect.  Be wary of breathing the fumes and it's not good for the hands either.  Wear elbow length rubber gloves and have a rinse hose at the ready.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 03 2011 at 00:30


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Fantasy
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Joined: November 30 2006
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Posted: June 03 2011 at 07:08 | IP Logged Quote Fantasy

Jim,

I left the boat in GA for a month (Apr-May) and when I returned found that the intakes were covered with soft growth that slowed down water flow, considerably.  A diver scrubbed them with a brush and that worked for me. 

I know of others who have sucked up debris and they were able to back flush with a garden hose attached before the strainer.

John



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Grey Goose
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Posted: June 03 2011 at 09:27 | IP Logged Quote Grey Goose

Thanks Pete

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Delaware Jim
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Posted: June 03 2011 at 13:38 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

John & Pete

Thanks for the ideas... I am having the boat pulled for paint in a week or two and will obviously have them clean all the thru hulls then... I'll also check them before it goes back in.

Open end question on the same subject... I have trouble rationalizing barnacle growth INSIDE the piping  in my circumstance...as live aboards down here at least 1 or two AC's are always running and water is pumping through all AC's essentially constantly from the single pump. I can unserstand barnacles growing inside lines where one is a weekend warrior and have the AC water supply system idle long enough for the barnacle to attach/grow - but not in my situation.

Given this thought, I believe I'm gonna try a bleach solution (a bucket ful then stop the pump) followed by compressed air line blowout.  The muratic acid idea I'll reserve until other less toxic options are eliminated.

Jim



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Pete37
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Posted: June 03 2011 at 16:37 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

I'd look for grass and seaweed in the Groco thru-hull first. The Groco filters can be accessed from inside the boat so you dont need to wait for hauling. But my guess is that you've already done that.  I agree that the air conditioner water moves too fast for barnacles to accumulate.

BTW: There is a chemical called "Barnacle Buster" which they claim is effective.  But like everything it costs.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 03 2011 at 16:49


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Pete37
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Posted: June 11 2011 at 01:09 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: A New Type of Varnish

A few weeks ago I mentioned that there was a new type of varnish that would allow you to put on up to six coats of varnish in a single day.  Actually, it’s not a true varnish; it’s a two-part clear alkyd-urethane paint with no pigment.  The key to its speed of application is that it can be applied in a wet on wet procedure.  The first coat is applied and allowed to dry to a tacky state in about an hour.  The second coat is then applied over the tacky first coat. No sanding is required between coats.  This process can be repeated for up to six coats.  It can be applied to bare wood or over previously varnished surfaces.  Four coats are recommended for previously varnished surfaces; six for bare wood.

The product is Bristol Finish:

www.bristolfinish.com 

I bought some a few days ago and at $60 per quart it is a bit more expensive than traditional varnishes.  Preparation for application is about the same as for traditional varnishes.  The surface must be dry and free of any oils.

There has been some controversy about Bristol with some users complaining that bubbles appeared a few months after application.  But for each complaint there seems to be a rave review.  Problems generally seem to be due to poor surface preparation.  However, both “Practical Sailor” and “Boat Owner’s Reports” have tested it and both gave it excellent reviews.

Today I made my first test of Bristol.  Starting at 10:00 AM I applied one coat every hour and finished the last of four coats before 2:00 PM.  I did the transom railing and the trim on the starboard side; an area of about 13 square feet which took about 15 minutes.  I’ll turn the boat around to get the port side and the side hand rails will be removed and done in the garage.  Bristol is somewhat thinner than traditional varnish which makes it prone to sags.  The solution is to apply all but the final coat without worrying much about sags.  The surface is then allowed to cure for 24 hours, is sanded and then a final thin coat is applied.

I tried to avoid sags but had some.  I will have to let it cure, sand and apply a final coat.  But of course I’ve had some sags in just about every varnish job I’ve done.  Other than the sags, the surface is beautiful with a deep glasslike luster.  Coverage is pretty good.  One quart will put four coats on 50 sq. feet which is a bit more than the area of the wood trim on a Connie.

The saving in time is enormous.  With traditional varnishes, varnishing a Connie would take two to three weeks depending on weather.  With Bristol the same job could be done in three days.  And yearly one coat touch-ups could be done in a day.  Cost wise a can of Bristol is $60.  A professional varnish job is $1800.  Of course, I have to admit, the professional job is better. 

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 11 2011 at 01:17


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Pete37
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Posted: June 11 2011 at 19:54 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Subject: Finished Varnish Job

Today, I went back to the boat and completed the application of the Bristol Finish.  All that was required was to sand out all the dimples, pimples and sags with 220 grit sandpaper. 

After only 24 hours the Bristol Finish was hard enough to sand and it took only about 20 minutes to sand out all the imperfections leaving a surface as smooth as a baby;s backside.  Then I applied a very thin (to avoid sags) final finish coat. 

The final coat went on smooth but in spite of my best efforts there were still a few dust imperfections.  However, it's as good a job as I've ever done with traditional varnish.

So far, I'm very satisfied.  Only time will tell how it stands up.

Pete37



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Fly Bridge
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Posted: June 11 2011 at 21:07 | IP Logged Quote Fly Bridge

PETE37"  I went past your Connie, a week ago. At least, I THINK, it was yours.   Was there a for sale sign, in the window?? 

Fly Bridge. 



Edited by Fly Bridge on June 11 2011 at 21:08


__________________
1979 Chris Craft,Catalina Sedan FB, 33ft. 2 Helms, 2/5.7. New 2004. Port eng. removed to rebuild. Starboard operating. Presently in "Backyard Dry Dock". Home Port:Holiday,Florida. (danbushey@msn.com)
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Pete37
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Posted: June 11 2011 at 22:32 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Fly Bridge,

It seems unlikely that it was my Connie since my Connie is in MD and you seem to operate in FL.  Anyway, no my Connie is not for sale.  Where did you see this Connie? 

There are 119 yachts named "Interlude" and a whole bunch are in FL.  And there are even a small number of Interludes in Fl of about 50' LOA.  But as far as I know there's only one Chris Craft Constellation named Interlude.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 11 2011 at 22:40


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Fly Bridge
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 11:52 | IP Logged Quote Fly Bridge

Pete37:   Obviously, I am mistaken, and presumed, wrongly, this was your Constellation.  As to the location of the Connie in question, it is within 100 yards of the Kent Narrows draw bridge, on Kent Narrows South road, under the over-head bridge, berthed near end of pier. 

Regards, Fly Bridge. 



__________________
1979 Chris Craft,Catalina Sedan FB, 33ft. 2 Helms, 2/5.7. New 2004. Port eng. removed to rebuild. Starboard operating. Presently in "Backyard Dry Dock". Home Port:Holiday,Florida. (danbushey@msn.com)
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Pete37
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 12:01 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Fly Bridge,

The Connie you saw was "Tachmier".  She's a 1985 Connie 500 (hull 112) which formerly was called "Gods Gift".  I don't know the owner.  He doesn't seem to be using the boat much.  I don't think I've ever seen it out of the slip.  However, I didn't know she was for sale.

Her engines were rebuilt back around 1997 and after that she sat around in Wilkins old brokerage yard on South River for about five years.  She was listed with 500 hours on the engines back in 2004 at $235K.  She finally sold to the present owner in September 2006. 

So she should have low hours on her engines.  The 2003 brokers listing shows her with a fairly standard set of accessories.  She isn't listed on Yachtworld so I guess the owner is trying to sell her himself.

My Connie is north of the Narrows bridge at Piney Narrows Yacht Haven.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 12 2011 at 12:22


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Fly Bridge
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 12:12 | IP Logged Quote Fly Bridge

PETE37:   Thank you, Pete.  Yes, there was a "For sale" sign in the window.  It was the type of sign, normally found in hardware stores, of orange background, with white or black lettering.  As you are on the north-side, interestingly, I have made truck-load delivery of seafood (frozen shrimp) to the distributor on the bend in road, down the street, from the restaurant.  I returned from retirement, as a over-the road truck driver, for a short period of time recently.  

Regards, Fly Bridge.



Edited by Fly Bridge on June 12 2011 at 12:13


__________________
1979 Chris Craft,Catalina Sedan FB, 33ft. 2 Helms, 2/5.7. New 2004. Port eng. removed to rebuild. Starboard operating. Presently in "Backyard Dry Dock". Home Port:Holiday,Florida. (danbushey@msn.com)
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Pete37
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 12:39 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

I just did a check on what Connies are selling for now.  I won't go into that here.  It's too depressing.

However I did find one 1985 Connie which has been on brokerage for at least ten years at an asking price of $290K.  It makes you wonder about the owner.  After ten years on the market she still hasn't sold.  When are they going to realize it's overpriced?

Pete37



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Fly Bridge
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 12:50 | IP Logged Quote Fly Bridge

Constellation's for sale:   Perhaps the owner of the boat in question, does not really have any desire or reason to sell, and has the funds to just "sit on the price" and unfazed, if their vessel sells, or not.  That's the only reason I percieve the price remains at that level.  Can't say as I blame them though.   Really nice vessels, the Constellation's!!

Fly Bridge.  

 



__________________
1979 Chris Craft,Catalina Sedan FB, 33ft. 2 Helms, 2/5.7. New 2004. Port eng. removed to rebuild. Starboard operating. Presently in "Backyard Dry Dock". Home Port:Holiday,Florida. (danbushey@msn.com)
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TStellato
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 14:23 | IP Logged Quote TStellato



If anyone is replacing their old Robertson autopilot, we would be interested in the old auto pilot - any model to use for parts.


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1985 Constellation
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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 15:05 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete,

Didn't know about your varnishing project until after you's already started...  That said.  I tried Bristol Finish last winter on my swim platform.  Fully sanded off the previous finish and followed the instructions.  In fact, had a PhD chemist and her aero-engineering husband (seasoned home re-habers both) working beside me.

Net, it was a disaster.  It looked great on the boat for a month, then showed rapid signs of blistering, fading and fogging on the side to the sun.  By the end of the summer it was an embarrassment.  Called the company and spoke with the owner/inventor who was convinced I'd made an application error.  Don't think so...  Unless exposure to humidity constitutes an error. 

This winter I had all of the wood refinished the old fashioned way with 11 coats.  The advice I got, was that the 6 coats of Bristol simply wasn't enough, should have been 8 plus.  Even then I'm not so certain it would have worked.

I think a big difference between your and my situation is your covered slip.  I took my Connie right back out in the sun into my uncovered slip and we had a very dry summer here in Cincinnati.  Can't predict what your combination of humidity and salt might do.  But, beware.

I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you.  I'd like for this formulation to work and reliably so.  That's my worry ... that this is a relatively new formula and that something in the formula or processing is unreliable making for variation in output quality.

I'm sure you'll let us know.

Mark




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Delaware Jim
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 15:23 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Mark, Pete and all,

Bristol finish:  a sailing friend of mine used Bristol finish on his boat and after 5 years (one recoating) it still looked damn good.  I started using it on our Connie 3 years ago.  It needs another coat now, but it has held up and still looks pretty good.  Couple of "discoveries" about Bristol - "Bubbling" occurs when the prior coat isnt cured enough and the outgas underneath th current coat creates the bubbles.  Bristol says to repeat coats quickly, but expect bubbles.  As Pete said, they sand off easily and a single final topcoat does the trick.  Surface Prep - I sanded off a portion of railing of the old peeling varnish, used a teak cleaner (acid based), rinsed and then began to coat when the water evaporated.  Came out very blotchy!  I believe I may not have completely cleaned the teak cleaner off before coating, with unacceptable results.  One more project for fall/winter here in Florida (mid 90's every day now...)

Jim



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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 15:38 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Tony and Vicki:  Autopilot

I have two Cetec Benmar Compu-Course 2100's.  Don't know if these were previously Robertson's or not.  I noticed that Robertson and Simrad seem to have joined and updated their equipment.  Also seems that Cetec Benmar has been out of circulation since around 2009, at least that's the most recent Google post.  So, figured it was worth a mention.   Let me know.




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Delaware Jim
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 15:39 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

All

AC Water lines:  I am learning how "abusive" the Florida environment really is to th boat... I went three weeks (live aboard) without cleaning the AC intake stariner and it was a mess!  Also noted the discharge fitting water flows were significantly reduced.

One AC quit due to too little water, so I opened the water lines at the unit and found the lines almost completely clogged with Marine growth.

The Fix?? Start cleaning the strainer weekly.  I plumbed in a garden hose fitting into the AC water line just after the pump.  Purchased a small 110V pump at Northern Tool and hooked it up to the new fitting (AC pump off, naturally).  Once my little pump primed, I filled the  intake bucket with a gallon of bleach and a gallon of water and pumped through the system and allowed to sit for ~ 15 minutes. Chased it with lots of fresh water... after a couple of minutes, I could feel the pump shake and hunker down as a "plug" broke free and was flushed out.  Water flow is 2X better than previously observed and all AC's working well (absolutely necessary in the Florida summer!).  I am planning on pumping some bleach through monthly to keep the system clean and operating well.

Jim

BTW, A friend in Maryland has the same problem this week - just takes longer to happen in cooler water...

Jim 



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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 15:44 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Jim - good to know in retrospect...However, I didn't see evidence of bubbles for about a month, so, don't know how to correlate the diagnoses.  Would help for Bristol to come forward with FAQ hints and tips like these ... might have saved me a lot of time and money...

M



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Delaware Jim
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 16:15 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Mark,

As your "bubbles" in the finish appeared a month or two later, I am wondering about the application approach.  Did you take the platform off and completely finish BOTH sides. All edges and bolt holes?  I can imagine that moisture could work through the wood from an unprotected area or uncoated spot and bubble/cloud the finish from underneath the finish. 

Railings are generally coated completely and become "sealed"... I have one railing spot (underneath) that didn't get coated well by accident and it has done exactly as you've described... clouds up and the finish lifted in a growing area over time.

Jim



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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 16:54 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Jim,

I think we were pretty thorough.  Yes, we did take the platform off and sand every nook and cranny and then refinish every area as well.  I would be worried that a miss on a small area like a bolt hole would lead to overall deterioration across the whole piece like I experienced.  One thing we did wonder was if we put each coat on thick enough.  It can be hard to measure when the treatment allows for a wet-on-wet approach, but, its been over a year now and hard to remember the minute details.

This is what leads us, my chemist friend included, to wonder if the process of making the formula is a bit inconsistent or more demanding than the instructions would lead you to believe.

Best,
Mark


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Pete37
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 18:04 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

I didn't see any signs of bubbles although I had a number of sags.  I think you have to get used to how to apply the Bristol.  It's somewhat thinner than ordinary varnish.  After doing four coats the first day I sanded the surface after it had cured for 24 hours with 220 grit paper to get rid of the sags.  During the sanding I didn't find any bubbles.

Swim platforms can be troublesome because they are so close to the water and get thoroughly impregnated with salt water.  They also have lots of seams.  I remember similar horror stories which occurred with traditional varnish.

Before I committed to Bristol I researched it a bit on the web.  I found some people who had trouble with it but also a lot of people who were delighted with it. I found that "Practical Sailor" and  "Boat Owners Reports" had both tested Bristol and gave it an excellent rating.  Unfortunately I dont subscribe to either magazine so I don't have the details.

BTW: Harold Marshal Nix, the inventor of Bristol died on May 5, 2011.

So far, everything has worked as advertised.  I read the instructions three times before starting and did everything by the book.  Of course I can't say what will happen a year from now.  Apparently Jim and his sailor friend had success but Dmark didn't.  However, to answer Dmark's question, "Yes, exposure to humidity is definitely an error." Most of the failures I've heard of involved slightly damp wood or wood with traces of teak oil.

Pete37

 



Edited by Pete37 on June 12 2011 at 18:05


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David Ross
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 18:17 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

The Connie with the the hardware store for sale sign on it reminded me of a guy who did not want to sell his boat but his wife did. When the sign was posted we knew his wife was aboard....  May be a similar story with the high priced Connie.

I still use Captains vanish. Under the shed I get two years between varnishes. I have gone three but I have a pretty good build up. If you have the touch, and catch it between not too wet and not too dry, you can apply a second coat (no more) without sanding. Takes practice and experience and not worth it if you mess up. When I had an uncovered slip each spring was time to revarnish to keep it pristine. Varnishing time is the only time I don't regret the lack of palm trees.



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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 18:51 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete,

Appreciate the extra pointers, but the atmosphere was humid, not the surface of the wood.  But, best wishes.  I want a victory here, I'm all for innovation and progress as long as it produces some that's "different and better."

M



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Pete37
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 19:35 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark,

I grew up in the age where runabouts were plastic but yachts were still wood.  So I got a thorough education on wood when I got my first yacht.  One of the golden rules about teak was "Never Varnish Teak".

Teak is a wonderful wood.  It's strong and impervious to rot.  But the reason it's impervious to rot is that it's a naturally oily wood.  And it's the oil that keeps the teak from rotting.

When teak is varnished (in spite of the rule) it is usually treated before varnishing to remove the surface oil.  This eliminates the oil close to the surface and makes it possible to get the varnish to stick.  But this only gets rid of the oil very close to the surface and in time the oil further in begins to migrate to the surface and when it does the varnish peels off.  So don't expect a long lasting varnish job on teak.

Some experts recommend an acetone wash before varnishing.  Others recommend muriatic acid.  However, muriatic acid will also bleach the wood.  The first coat of varnish should be thinned by about 30% to get better penetration of the wood.

In spite of the problems, teak is sometimes successfully varnished. But varnishing teak is asking for problems.  If you didn't treat the teak before varnishing, it may have been too oily to take any kind of varnish.

Ironically, sanding the wood down before varnishing may have made things worse by exposing internal layers of the wood that still had significant amounts of oil.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on June 12 2011 at 20:35


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Pete37
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 20:43 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

In this case there's only one owner; a widow.  I don't think the boat gets used much and the advertising is done by a broker on the web.  This broker must have extreme patience.

Pete37



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TStellato
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 21:29 | IP Logged Quote TStellato



Mark,

I appreciate the offer, but do not think that they are compatable with the unit that we have.  I think that I need to stay with the Robertson brand.


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DMark
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Posted: June 12 2011 at 21:56 | IP Logged Quote DMark

Pete,

We thought about the teak question.  We followed Bristol's recommended procedures.  Would have expected after sanding to find evidence of oil in the wood dust.  But, then its a 25 year old swim platform... There was absolutely no evidence of oil.  So we treated with acetone anyway and then applied 6 coats of the the Bristol.

Interestingly, When I took the swim platform off this winter, the underside towards the river water was just fine.  The surface that received most of the sunlight was the one that showed damage.  Another guess is some failure against UV protection.

So, some good suggestions for future treatments.  Would have been nice as I said to have had some additional suggestions like yours in the instructions and FAQ's from the manufacturer, but, sadly in my case, those weren't available.

Hope you added those steps when you did yours...

M



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Pete37
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Posted: June 13 2011 at 01:26 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Mark.

The oil isn't that obvious.  It would be hard to detect it.  Don't expect to find an oil well.  If you sanded the surfaces heavily you didn't have a 25 year old swim platform; you had a brand new one.

However, if you treated the surface with acetone that.should have solved the problem. But a wooden swim platform regardless of material used has dozens of seams and when the boat is in service the platform gets periodically dunked in sea water.  It then swells and dries. Plus there are stress effects. 

So a wooden swim platform would normally have a lot of water entering through the expansion and stress cracks.  Therefore, it's very hard to get a satisfactory varnish job on a swim platform regardless of the type of varnish used.  And the fact that it's teak, to which varnish doesn't bond very well, just makes things worse.

Pete37



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boatman66
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Posted: June 18 2011 at 11:56 | IP Logged Quote boatman66

HI CONNIE GUYS NOSING AROUND AND CAUGHT THE BRISTOL VARNISH THREADS-I DID MY 294 WITH IT AND WAS VERY IMPRESSED HOWEVER I HAD THE SAME RESULTS WITH THE VARNISH CRACKING AND BLISTERING (IN THIN LINES) AND PEELING BUT ONLY ON THE AREAS EXPOSED TO THE RELENTLESS FLORIDA SUN THE UNDERSIDES ARE STILL TO THIS DAY PRISTINE IT ESPECIALLY WENT UGLY ON THE BOW PULPIT I HAD TO REMOVE THE THING SAND IT DOWN ENTIRELY AND REINSTALLED IT COMPLETELY BARE OF ANYTHING EXCEPT TEAK OIL EVEN THAT DID NOT HOLD UP- NOW IT (BOW PULPIT)IS BARE AND AGEING WELL AND THAT'S THE WAY IT IS GOING TO STAY-MY HAND RAILS ARE STILL BRISTOLED AND STILL PEELING AND SOMEDAY I WILL DISASSEMBLE AND REDO I THINK IT IS A U-V RAY PROBLEM AND AM WONDERING IF THERE IS A COATING OR SOMETHING THAT CAN GO OVER OR BE MIXED INTO THE APPLICATION-BELIEVE ME I FOLLOWED THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE LETTER IT IS A BEAUTIFUL THING WHEN DONE 

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Pete37
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Posted: June 18 2011 at 18:00 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi All,

Sounds like we have a common thread that the Bristol doesn't hold up well on teak.  Especially in severe sunlight.  Of course traditional varnish doesn't hold up well under those conditions either.

One might say only those who keep their boats under cover should use it.  But then there are sailboaters who use it successfully and sailboats are rarely kept in covered sheds.

Perhaps this is a heat problem.  I've walked across teaks decks and in the Florida sun they're hot enough to burn your feet.

Pete37



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