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Ken27
"Deckhand"




Joined: December 12 2006
Posts: 138
Posted: March 25 2008 at 14:36 | IP Logged Quote Ken27

John,

Yes, having everything on displays would be great, and I too, have envisioned three displays.  It can be done now, but I fear, by the time the boat is equipped with the high tech equipment, it would cost more than our boats are worth.

I have only used the display for the chart plotter, and occasionally to show the camera views and sonar.   I can set the screen up to show all four windows, chartplotter, sonar, radar, and camera displays, however, because the radar isn't installed yet, I haven't decided if we'll run with the radar overlayed or in it's own screen next to, or above the plotter.

Ken



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'85 500, Home port Nashville, TN,
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TStellato
"Deckhand"




Joined: August 12 2007
Posts: 206
Posted: March 25 2008 at 18:54 | IP Logged Quote TStellato



Hello everyone,

I've been keeping warm over the winter.  Tony is back in MD so we are stripping the teak, etc.  Have de-winterized the engines and are hauling out next month to do the bottom.

Have some exciting news (at least to us).  While going through papers for the boat, I looked at the  abstract again.  When we bought the boat there was an article on board on the first 50 Connie produced after Chris Craft bought the Uniflite factory.  It turns out we are the first boat produced!  I have a reprint of the newspaper article (from the Tideland News in Swansboro, NC) that some of you saw when we met in the fall.  The names of the owners match the original owners on our abstract.  So our hull #499 is really hull #1.  The original name was MS JAZ and it was purchased by Merton and Audrey Zitin of PA for $500,000.  The article shows the couple and also a picture of the stern. We now know that our aft windows in the master stateroom are not factory original.  I now wonder whether hull #498 that Pete mentioned is really hull #2.

It may explain some differences in our boat.  We have painted doors to the staterooms and the heads like the Uniflite, the trash compactor is listed in the article, so somewhere along the way it was removed. The original colors stated were oatmeal and mauve and it said that it had teak floors throughout the lower salon.  When we bought the boat, some of the teak floors had been removed over the main hatches and also in parts of the upper salon.

Kind of exciting to us to know more of the history of our boat.  Jim, I will be working on a history of at least our boat now that I know more. 

On another note, I am going to see about Harrison's in Knapps Narrow to see about pricing and availability for a Sat/Sun gathering.  They have hosted several other boating clubs.  The restaurant is there, etc.  I will let you know what I find out.

Vicki


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Tony and Vicki
FIVE STAR
1985 Constellation
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Delaware Jim
"Navigator"




Joined: December 27 2006
Posts: 381
Posted: March 25 2008 at 20:17 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Vicki,

Let's communicate off line here to work on the CB Group page... your ideas sounds great!  It IS really neat to do the "archaeology" on your boat!  I kinda wondered about mine having an SSB radio for offshore work, and found a receipt stating the galley refrigerator had been repaired in Bimini.  This confirms the boat has been into the Carabean (sp) area... Maybe I'll get a SSB license and repair the antenna connections and see if I can get it working...

Unfortunately, I cannot afford new instruments right now, but I do have manual direct measuring water temp and oil pressure gauges on each engine and I check them regularly (at least once a day) while underway.  This kinda confirms temps readings and I should spot any major differences... I've also tested with the infra red gun and the gauges are pretty consistent on temps. The tachs are tested periodically opposite a hand held electronic tach and the tachs are also pretty close... for example, at idle, the starboard and port tachs read about 580 and 595 RPM respectively, while the electronic tach shows 586 and 602 rpm - close enough for my purposes!

Delaware Jim



Edited by Delaware Jim on March 25 2008 at 20:18


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"Still In the Mood"
1985 Chris Craft 500 Constellation
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TStellato
"Deckhand"




Joined: August 12 2007
Posts: 206
Posted: March 25 2008 at 20:20 | IP Logged Quote TStellato


BTW they bought the bought August 9, 1984 and left the Swansboro docks on August 10th.  I also found the original electrical blueprints for both the 46 Uniflite and the 50 Connie.  And the original engine and Onan books.


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Tony and Vicki
FIVE STAR
1985 Constellation
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David Ross
"Navigator"




Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: March 25 2008 at 21:35 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Hi all,

 I have three Stewart Warner fuel pumps that I believe were factory installed. There is one for each engine both installed in front of the starboard engine. The one for the genie is installed next to the port side of engine room doorway. Each pump has a switch and when pushed you can hear it pumping. Originally I thought they were used for filling the racor canisters when changing the fuel filters but nothing was pumped into the canisters. A mechanic told me the pumps were plumbed into the pressure pump on the engines. Does anyone have this set up on your boat? What are the Stewert Warner pumps used for? 

Didn't mean to change the subject... just thought I'd ask while a few of you were on the line. By the way I think the Maptec Pro charting system has the ability to show gauges on a screen but not sure what is envolved or what else you need.

Dave



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DAVE
GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
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Banjoman
"First Mate"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 553
Posted: March 25 2008 at 22:15 | IP Logged Quote Banjoman

Dave - these pumps are fuel priming pumps.  EX: Should you disturb the injectors you can prime the engines with these pumps.

__________________
Capt. G. Emory Shover
m/v "SOUTHERN CHARM"
Eastern Marine Services, LLC
Marine Survey - Yacht Delivery
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: March 25 2008 at 23:59 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Emory is right.  The Stewart Warner fuel pumps are for repriming the engines in the event that you run out of fuel or do major work on the fuel system that would leave the input dry.  I have them too and they are mounted on the forward engine room bulkhead in front of the starboard engine.  I've used them a couple of times.  There is also a circuit breaker to supply power to them on the lower console accessory circuit breaker panel.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 26 2008 at 00:42


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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: March 26 2008 at 00:11 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Tony & Vicki,

As far as I can tell there were only two Uniflite 50s produced and sold under the Uniflite brand name.  But I think that Chris Craft took over all the hulls that were partially built at the time they bought the Swansboro, NC factory, finished them and sold them as CC Connies. 

As many as 11 of the early 1985 Connies may be Uniflite hulls which were finished by CC and sold as Connies. There are 11 Connies the construction of which was started in August 1984 or before. The earliest was hull #102 (Jun 1984) which I have as "The Bristol" although she may have a new name now.  Your Connie, however, appears to have been the first hull finished under CC ownership.

Strangely, the hull numbering system does not seem to have been completely chronolgical.  "Bluebonnet" (Hull #103) wasn't started until September, while "Sweet Girl" (Hull #110) was started in August, 1984.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 27 2008 at 00:04


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Ken27
"Deckhand"




Joined: December 12 2006
Posts: 138
Posted: March 26 2008 at 00:31 | IP Logged Quote Ken27

Pete/Emory,

S/W fuel pumps?!  This is another new bit of info for me.  Were these factory options or add on's that a few owners engineered themselves?

Vickie, is there a chance you could post a picture of your aft stateroom windows?  We've been talking about doing something like that for sometime now, but unsure how to do it.

Ken



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Pete37
"Commander"




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Posts: 2317
Posted: March 26 2008 at 00:55 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Ken,

S/W fuel pumps were not listed as accessories in 1985 but are listed as a $749 extra on the 1986 accessory list.  A few 1985 owners may have added them though.

Pete37



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David Ross
"Navigator"




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Posts: 452
Posted: March 26 2008 at 09:09 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Emory and Pete,

Thanks for the reply on the S/W pumps. Pete, I don't remember seeing a breaker for the pumps anywhere. I assume by lower console you mean the lower saloon circuit console. I plan on going down to the boat this weekend for a few days to start the spring chores and will check for a breaker.

Dave



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GOOD SPIRITS
500 CONSTELLATION (1987)
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rvolker
"Seaman Recruit"




Joined: October 18 2007
Posts: 8
Posted: March 26 2008 at 10:49 | IP Logged Quote rvolker

The S/W pumps are there to prime your fuel system, as needed, and can also be used to provide some additional fuel lift if your engine fuel lift pump is compromised.  I have reconfigured these pumps and related plumbing to provide fuel polishing in addition to priming.  In doing so, I relocated these pumps to the aft bulkhead in the engine room just starboard of the fuel distribution manifold.  This located just seemed a better that the orginal location on the forward bulkhead.  The battery switch and isolation diodes that were factory installed in this located were removed since the charging/battery setup has been upgraded and this equipment no longer served any purpose.  To perform polishing (vice priming) a bypass valve was added to connect the fuel feed to the return lines.  This valve is located near the engine where these 2 lines tend to pass by each other.  The polishing setup uses the RACOR 1000MA primary fuel filters.  I would like to add an separate polishing filter, but there is limited space to install another filter setup. 

I filter (polish) the fuel often during the winter and less so during the cruising season (most often after I have taken on a load of new fuel).  I have been using this setup for several years with much success.  



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Randy
Freedom
Point Loma, CA
Constellation 460 - 1986
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Banjoman
"First Mate"




Joined: July 02 2007
Posts: 553
Posted: March 26 2008 at 12:14 | IP Logged Quote Banjoman

Randy - darn great idea!  I'd love to talk with you regarding this system at some point.  Maybe I'll get down your way and view the polishing system you've created.  Would that be a possibility?  Thanks!



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Capt. G. Emory Shover
m/v "SOUTHERN CHARM"
Eastern Marine Services, LLC
Marine Survey - Yacht Delivery
www.easternmarineservices.com
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rvolker
"Seaman Recruit"




Joined: October 18 2007
Posts: 8
Posted: March 26 2008 at 16:32 | IP Logged Quote rvolker

Emory,

Most of the effort was is designing the polishing system and relocating the priming pumps to the aft bulkhead.  The rest of the changes were not too involved.  This design should be directly applicable to your boat.  Let me know when you want to stop by.



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Randy
Freedom
Point Loma, CA
Constellation 460 - 1986
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TStellato
"Deckhand"




Joined: August 12 2007
Posts: 206
Posted: March 26 2008 at 17:50 | IP Logged Quote TStellato


Ken,

I will take some pictures of the windows.  I will attempt to post them on the site.  If I have trouble, maybe Pete will help me if I email them to him lol!  It is one of the items that I will email to Jim to put on the new site.  They were done so well that we thought they may have been done at the factory, but we now know that it was done as after market.  It makes a big difference both with getting a breeze and giving the master some natural light.  We do have to watch our cat though because she like to sit in the window!  We also have screens that snap on the inside to keep out any bugs.

Vicki



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Tony and Vicki
FIVE STAR
1985 Constellation
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Delaware Jim
"Navigator"




Joined: December 27 2006
Posts: 381
Posted: March 26 2008 at 18:30 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Pete,

I've developed a firendship with JD and Sandi Hay of Hampton VA who has a 1984 Uniflite 50.  I am aware they purchased in Florida about 18 months ago and have been rebuilding into a liveaboard (see pix on my website).  I'll ask about their hull ID number so you can add it to your list as needed.

Delaware Jim



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"Still In the Mood"
1985 Chris Craft 500 Constellation
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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
Posts: 2317
Posted: March 26 2008 at 23:59 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

Invite your friends to join into the forum activities.  We would be interested in hearing about the history of their yacht and any problems they may be having.

Pete37



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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
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Posted: March 27 2008 at 00:15 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

The "Fuel Prime Pump" power switch is on the DC Accessories Circuit Breaker Panel located on the starboard side of the lower instrument console.  It is on the lower row of breakers and is 5th from the right.

Pete37



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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
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Posted: March 27 2008 at 01:07 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Guys,

I'm a little surprised that you can use the S/W fuel priming pumps for fuel polishing.  I've had to use them a few times for repriming and didn't get the idea that they had anywhere near the capacity needed for fuel polishing.

Normally in fuel polishing you pump a boat tank dry and put the fuel in a couple of 55 gallon drums.  The pump has Racor type fuel filters and cleans the fuel as the boat tank is pumped dry.  The crud is separated and dumped in a separate tank.  The fuel is then pumped back into the boat's tank.  It is filtered again as it is pumped back into the boat so you wind up with twice filtered fuel when you're finished.

Most of the crud is usually found in the last few gallons pumped out of the boat's tank so it's important that the tank be pumped dry.  Just pumping a little out of the tank doesn't do much.  The aft tanks are 200 gallon tanks so to pump one dry and then refill it requires pumping 400 gallons through a tight filter (usually 1 micron). For a 5 gpm pump a single 200 gallon tank would take 80 minutes (both ways) and to polish the fuel in all of the tanks would take a about 240 minutes (4 hours).  My experience with the commercial polishers is that it usually takes about 2 hours so they must have about 10 gpm pumps.  And the amount of crud would normally overwhelm the reservoir of the biggest Racor I have.

In a typical diesel about 2/3 or more of the fuel pumped through the Racors is used for cooling the injectors and is not burned.  And when you are running fuel sloshes around so the crud is fairly evenly distributed in the fuel.  So every few hours all of the fuel in your tanks is run through your fuel filters and is essentially polished if your Racor filter elements are clean.  Therefore , in normal use there is no need to polish the fuel in your tanks.  Polishing is normally needed only when you have a major problem with your fuel tanks such as water in your tanks or when algea has grown in your tanks due to long periods of inactivity.

Pete37



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David Ross
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Joined: January 02 2007
Posts: 452
Posted: March 27 2008 at 14:17 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Randy and Pete,

Randy, thanks for confirming the S/W  pumps are to prime the fuel system. Sounds like your conversion is rather unique.

Pete, thanks for pinpointing where the S/W fuel pump breaker is located. I will check if mine is in the same location when I go to the boat this week end. I am curious since I don't recall seeing a breaker for the pumps though I never specifically looked for it.

If the S/W pump is for priming the fuel system does this mean that you don't have to open a line to bleed any air out if there is a problem or does it depend what is causing the problem?

Dave



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Pete37
"Commander"




Joined: November 12 2006
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Posted: March 27 2008 at 15:19 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Guys, 

I checked my fuel priming pumps and found that they were Model #82055 S/W Marine Fuel Pumps running on 12V, made in July of 1986 with a max pressure of 7.5 psi. They are no longer made or supported.  However, service kits are still in stock.  Call Stewart Warner @ 410-581-1000 x 287. 

My boat has only two pumps.  One for the starboard engine and one for the port engine.

The replacement is a Model #82092 which runs on 12V, has a max pressure of 8 psi and a maximum output of 43gph (0.72 gpm).  The replacement costs $138.39 when in stock.  The size and shape is quite different from the #82055.

Polishing the fuel in a single 200 gallon fuel tank (out & back in) with this pump would take 9.3 hours.  To do all 600 gallons in the boat would take 27.9 hours.  It's pretty obvious this pump was never intended for use as a polishing pump.

While the S/W pumps don't seem to be of much use for polishing they might be great for use in transferring small amounts of fuel from one tank to another.  Or perhaps for pumping fuel out of someone else's tank.  For that purpose they are quite quiet and unobtrusive.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 27 2008 at 15:27


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rvolker
"Seaman Recruit"




Joined: October 18 2007
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Posted: March 28 2008 at 01:59 | IP Logged Quote rvolker

Actually WALBRO makes these pumps and sells them under several names, including Stewart Warner and their own name.  The replacement for what was originally installed on our boats (which is no longer manufactured) does have slightly (but not significant) different input and output configuration on the pump body.  The WALBRO pump can be purchased for $110 on-line.  If you have never serviced or replaced your pumps they probably do not work. 

The WALBRO pumps are rated for continuous duty and can be used to polish your fuel (if you modify the configuration of the fuel system) though at about 40 gallons per hour.  Many newer boats come with on-board polishing systems and there are many after-market systems available.  Some use pumps identical to what we have as priming pumps, though higher volume pumps are also available. These systems cost $$$$ but come with their own dedicated filters.   As Pete states, our engines do pump (and filter) lots of fuel while under way.  I configured my system to polish (filter) while sitting at the dock during the winter and during down time.  I install a 2 micron RACOR filter at the end of the cruising season and run the sytem for entended periods of time during the winter.  At the beginning of the cruising season, I install a 10 micron filter but still run the polishing system between cruises. 

The factory set up can prime the system if you bleed the system downstream of the pumps.  An added benefit of the polishing set-up is that I can fully load the RACOR filters after a filter change without bleeding, since the fuel feed and return line are connected downstream of the filters (and pumps) when in the polish mode.

If I was to upgrade my configuration, I would add higher volume pumps and install separate filters but given how simple this setup was I am content with a little extra fuel management capability that was achieved with minimal cost.   



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Randy
Freedom
Point Loma, CA
Constellation 460 - 1986
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Pete37
"Commander"




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Posted: March 28 2008 at 12:57 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Randy,

I'm a little surprised that you are so concerned with polishing your fuel.  I've had my Connie for 14 years and only polished the fuel in one tank one time.  That was when I inadvertently didn't tighten the fuel fill cap on the deck tight enough and over the winter about 20 gallons of rain water leaked into the tank.  But I've seen the polishing truck a number of times and talked to the service men. 

The biggest problem seems to be bad fuel received from marinas with leaky fuel tanks.  I had that happen one time on a previous diesel boat.  That was a mess.  They had to pick the boat up in a travel lift and tilt it so that all the fuel ran towards the ends of the tanks with the pickups.  Another common problem is leaky fuel tanks in the boats themselves.

Diesel fuel is usually considered to be good for at least 90 days after which it begins to degrade. But unfortunately the degraded fuel changes its chemical makeup and does not turn into particulates so polishing doesn't do much good.  Polishing will separate water from diesel fuel but won't separate one type of fuel from another.  If you pump gas into a diesel or vice-versa don't expect polishing to correct the problem.

My Racor fuel filters, which are polishing the fuel all the time, don't seem to pick up much crud.  By the end of the year, the elements will be black but still seem to be working.  In the 20-25 years that I've had diesels I have had bad fuel several times and know when the element is clogged by appearance and the behavior of the engine.  Clogged Racors do occur but not very often when you replace them at least once a year.  And even when they do occur it's only a few minutes work to replace them.  When you have the same Racor clog shortly after the first replacement then you had better think about polishing.

In order to make polishing effective you either have to stir the fuel (which you do when running) or completely empty the tanks (which a professional polishing job does).  Simply running a small fuel pump to pump fuel through a Racor doesn't do the job even if you do it 24/7 365 days a year.  You are just polishing and repolishing the same fuel while the cruddy fuel in the top, bottom and corners of the tank remains untouched.

The main problem with the fuel priming pumps (regardless of whether they are Walbro or Stewart Warner) is that they pump less than a gallon per minute and don't stir up the fuel enough to do much good.  Very fine particles may remain suspended in the fuel for a long time but the heavier particles will drop to the bottom where the pump will never touch them.  But the moment you start running the boat they will be stirred up again.  And the very light particles (below 1 micron) which remain suspended will go right through the Racors.

I've never replaced my fuel priming pumps and I doubt that many other owners have either.  I have used the fuel priming pumps though and they do seem to get the engines running again.  But, perhaps they're not as effective as they should be so maybe I should replace or rebuild them.  I'll put it on my "To Do" list but only as a "C" item.

There seems to be a misconception as to what "polishing" does.  It does not make old fuel good fuel.  It simply gets rid of water and particulates so that the fuel will go through the engines.  However, if the fuel is badly degraded it may not burn properly and can still damage your engines.  If you have 4 year old fuel the only thing you can do with it is dump it.  Polishing isn't going to fix it.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 28 2008 at 20:29


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Ken27
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Posts: 138
Posted: March 28 2008 at 15:56 | IP Logged Quote Ken27

Greetings everyone,

It's amazing how small successes can provide so much satisfaction.  For over two years I've been searching for a door gasket for the ice maker on our aft salon.  The original was junk!  Had to defrost the unit every 4 days to a week.  The unit is a U-Line which was made for them by Raritan, model B145A.  Both U-Line and Raritan told me the gasket has not been available for a long time.  Well, I finally found one.  In case anyone is looking, go to RepairClinic.com.  If you have the same unit, their item number is 948331, PN 31493-1-GRY, $23.30.  GRY means it's grey, not white.  I don't care.  I finally found one!

Concerning the priming pumps, I don't have them and wish I did.  We ran one tank dry, killed the engine, and had to hook up a small manual primer at the fuel filter like is shown in the J/T manual, to draw the fuel through.  At the time we didn't have the J/T manual, but figured it out by ourselves.  It worked well.

Ken



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'85 500, Home port Nashville, TN,
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Delaware Jim
"Navigator"




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Posted: March 28 2008 at 18:13 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Friends,

My boat has a different "priming" setup.  There is a crossover line between the two fuel filter canister bases with a ball valve in between.  When changing a filter or other reasons to prime, I do one engine and then open the crossover.  Start the engine not serviced and that engine will quickly fill the fuel lines and allow starting the other,  Reverse the process for the second engine.  The one time I replaced fuel filters since I've owned the boat showed it worked VERY well.  It only took 2-3 seconds of cranking to light up the serviced engine. No pumps to maintain or service!

Delaware Jim



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Pete37
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Posted: March 28 2008 at 20:08 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Ken,

When we get the new site going we ought to have a place to store reports on hard to find parts.  Hang on to your post and repost it when we have a place for it in the hard to find parts section.

On running the a tank dry.  With the screwball tank switches in Connies it's very easy to forget whether your running on the main tanks or the saddle tanks.   Therefore I make it a practice to always check both sets of tanks.  If either looks like it's near dry I go down and check the tank switches.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 28 2008 at 20:25


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Pete37
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Posted: March 28 2008 at 20:16 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

Normally changing fuel filter doesn't require repriming the engine.  Drain the water out of the bottom spigot, shut it off and then remove the top and pull out the old filter element.

Have a plastic bucket ready to put the old element in to eliminate the mess.  Take the bucket outside and examinine it for anything unusual.  Normally there aren't any surprises.

Then insert the new element and then backfill with clean fresh fuel right up to the top.  Then put the top back on.  The engine should fire up without any priming.  At least it has for me for the last 14 years.  I replace filters every fall or if I forget early in the spring.  Keep a record of the changes.  It's very easy to forget whether you've done the job or not and what the engine hours were.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on March 28 2008 at 20:21


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Ken27
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Posted: March 30 2008 at 19:56 | IP Logged Quote Ken27

Pete,

That's exactly what happened, someone forgot to check the valves, and the person at the helm, wasn't watching the gauges.  There were four of us on a long haul, running hard, 2000-2100 rpm's all day.  We all let our guard down, and didn't switch over the tanks when we should have.  I don't think that will ever happen again. 

I also, have never had to prime the sytem when changing filters.  I top them off, replace the cover, and the engines fire right up.  One thing I learned, when you do run a tank dry, if you haven't cranked on the dead engine for any length of time before switching over, if you set the throttles at half or more, open, most of the time it will catch and fire up right away.  Hold the throttles at half or more for a few seconds and after a short time they will pump the air through and continue to run without priming.

Ken



Edited by Ken27 on March 31 2008 at 17:12


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Delaware Jim
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Posted: March 31 2008 at 18:19 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Pete,

Generally, I agree with you that you do not need to prime IF you have a can of fuel to refill the Racor canister.  As I came up from Florida last summer, I was trying to run out old fuel, which rather regularly (for awhile) plugged up filters pretty quickly.  The crossover works well if you do not have spare clean fuel to top out the canister, or if you encounter a lift pump problem.  The crossover can keep you running (at idle speeds) on both engines off the one operating lift pump - a "limp home" mode.

Delaware Jim



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Posted: March 31 2008 at 18:51 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

Yes, you need to carry a priming jug aboard to prime your Racors if you have to change the filters.  I carry a 2 gallon priming jug aboard at all times for that purpose.  And it's a good idea to use up that fuel at least once a year and refill the jug with fresh fuel.

Pete37



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Delaware Jim
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Posted: April 01 2008 at 20:58 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

In my case, my fuel jug was empty and I was in the ICW when the engines started sputtering (rough running) due to plugged filters. I think the "limp home" feature may be a much stronger recommendation for this setup than simple priming for restart.

Delaware Jim



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Pete37
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Posted: April 02 2008 at 20:06 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Guys,

After much research I've decided how to mount my dinghy on my Connie.  I started the search last winter as you may remember and looked at hydraulically lifted swim platforms, transom davits and all kinds of low profile cranes.

The hydraulically lifted swim platforms and cranes were too expensive. 

I nearly selected a transom davit.  They're close to the water, relatively cheap (around $6,000) and require only minimal modifications to the boat.  But they put the dinghy in the soot zone, they add considerable length to the boat and they foul your stern mooring lines.  It was the last two items that really turned me off on transom davits.

I finally decided to mount the dinghy on a rack aft of and at the same height as the fly bridge in the same way that Emory and Corey have their dinghys mounted. 

The only problems with this approach are that it clutters up the appearance of the boat and it puts the dinghy a long way from the water making launch and retrieval a little bit sticky in rough weather.  The weight also makes the boat roll a bit more in rough weather. 

I took pictures of Emory's boat last fall at the rendezvous and think I can make my dinghy rack very similar.  The next problem is to select the davit or crane to lift the boat.  Cranes, tend to be expensive ($8,000 and up) so I think I'll use a davit.  The mechanical difference between a crane and a davit is a little vague but in general if the manufacturer calls it a crane it costs more.

Since I have a radar arch, I don't need a low profile crane or davit and that saves considerable money.  I have two davits under consideration, the Atkins & Hoyle Model 6000 and the Nick Jackson Model 1000.  The first costs $4200 and lifts 600 lbs while the second costs $4250 and lifts 1000 lbs.  I think I'm going to go with the Nick Jackson davit because although my dinghy weighs only 600 lbs. I may want to have a heavier dinghy later.

The Nick Jackson davit is a classic pipe davit but with composite sleave bearings to eliminate the problems with galling that all-aluminum pipe davits have.  Both davits have electric winches.

I did a survey of Connies and found that about 1 in 5 have a dinghy.  That should make about 15 Connies with dinghys but only about a third of them have owners who correspond on this forum.  If any of you have Adkins & Hoyle, Nick Jackson or other davits I would like to hear about your experience with them before I buy one.

Pete37



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David Ross
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Posted: April 03 2008 at 21:07 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete

I covered my Atkins & Hoyle set up awhile back but it didn't stir any interest. As mentioned then it works well for us and am pleased with the A & H so far. However it sounds like the Nick Jackson is the way to go for you due the extra capacity you may need later.

Previously I mentioned my master air conditoning unit works great when air conditioning but does not work at all in the heat mode. A couple of our chat buddies came back with the same quick fix that worked for them and I don't remember their response and can't find it. Do you our anyone else remeber what the fix envolved? With some cold nights still around I thought I would try to get it working.

Dave



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Pete37
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Posted: April 04 2008 at 00:03 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Dave,

Yes, I remember your A & H set up post.  As I remember it was just after I got back from Florida in early March.  Can't place the exact date but it should be relatively easy to look up on the archives.  Your post got me thinking about pipe davits (the A & H davit is sort of like a pipe davit) and I called them and got some data.  I was impressed and for a while the Model 6000 was my favorite davit.  Reasonable price and what seems like good quality.  I was particularly impressed with the bearing arrangement. 

But I would really like to have 1000 lb. lifting capacity because I have hopes of mounting a Whaler up there someday.  Nick Jackson's davit seems pretty good too and has more capacity.

The trick to finding a post is to know the date.  As I remember the discussion of heat output from A/Cs came up early in the winter (December or January). Look in the pages for those months.  It seems to me that Tony & Vicki or perhaps Delaware Jim wrote that post.  I know it was one of our Chesapeake live aboards.

When a heat pump refuses to change modes (A/C to heat) it's usually because the solenoid valve that changes the modes has malfunctioned.  Any decent A/C man should know how to fix that.  What manufacturer made your A/C and what size is it?  I may be able to find the solenoid on my A/C manuals.  Sometimes merely rapping a sticky solenoid will bring it back to life.

Pete37

PS:  I did a quick check and I think the posts you are looking for were made by Banjoman on November 21 and Delaware Jim on November 22.  Look on Page 74.



Edited by Pete37 on April 04 2008 at 00:24


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David Ross
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Posted: April 09 2008 at 07:37 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete,

I'll try rapping the solenoid for the master stateroom air condtioning heat mode and see if that works. If that doesn't work I'll get back to you with the air conditioner info and see if you can find the solenoid in your A/C manuals. I plan to go to the boat today for a few days to work on the to do list. Not sure where the solenoid tapping will work into the list. I did get Good Spirits commisioned last week but have a lot of items I want to attend to. 

Dave 



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Posted: April 09 2008 at 07:48 | IP Logged Quote David Ross

Pete,

I forgot to mention I checked the back posts from Delaware Jim and Banjoman and will also try to cycle from A/C and the heat modes a few times since it has worked for them. I'll try the easy "fix" first. Thanks for finding the back posts.

Dave



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Delaware Jim
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Posted: April 09 2008 at 22:39 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

Since we're discussing AC's... I am this week resolving my aft cabin issue (dead compressor) with a new 16K Ocean Breeze AC with a 2K resistance heat coil for heat.  The unit was at a good "off season" price and a 2007 model closeout.   As tis is a job I only want to "do once" the idea of a removal, carry to an AC guy for compressor replacement and a reinstall wasn't a whole bunch different from all new (including digital thermostat).

I have opened up the AC area (under the desk on the port side of the office) and have removed all plumbing, wiring, etc.  Tomorrow when I have another pair of hands I'll unblot and slide out old unit.  Units have only three wiring connections (AC, water pump relay, and thermostat) which are all clearly marked.  I need to drill out the pop rivets to remove the air plenum and transfer to the new unit. 

In general it is pretty much a simple undo, remove and replace process.  I'll need to reroute the cooling water lines a bit, but no big deal.

Hope everyone is doing well now that temps are warming!  I'm getting the itch to get her out for a spring shakedown run.



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Posted: April 09 2008 at 22:46 | IP Logged Quote Delaware Jim

BTW, another "Success" story...

Like many others have reported, the helm windshield wipers were not working when we purchased the boat last summer.  All three would move a part of an inch then freeze, which suggested they were OK electrically, but were siezed on the shaft or other mechanical problems.  I tried a penetrating spray solution "PB Blaster" which I've found is 'way ahead of other penetrating oils/solutions... it will DISSOLVE the corrosion over several days.  Anyway, a couple of sprays on each wiper shaft from the outside and a few days waiting and ALL THREE ARE OPERATINGl!  I will be following this with lightweight oils regularly (sewing machine oil) and buying new wiper blades.  Sometimes the simple things are the best solution!

Delaware Jim



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Posted: April 10 2008 at 09:35 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Guys,

If you have frozen windshield wipers as "Delaware Jim" did I would suggest you do as he did and clean them up as soon as possible.  The wiper systems are mounted behind the headpaneling over the console and are rather difficult to get at.  And as far as I can tell the motors are irreplaceable.  But if maintained properly they should last forever. 

I had to remove one of my wiper systems that wouldn't respond to the penetratng oil routine and can testify that it was a PITA job.

Pete37



Edited by Pete37 on April 10 2008 at 09:39


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Posted: April 10 2008 at 10:04 | IP Logged Quote Pete37

Hi Jim,

Normally, most marine A/C guys will replace a compressor "in situ".  There's no need to remove the A/C system from the boat although you should remove the paneling so that they can get at the A/C.  This is a very important point to keep in mind because some systems such as the rerigerator/freezer can't be easily removed from the boat.

Most Connies have the Marine Air A/C systems which are self contained, rather compact and easy to remove from the boat.  So if they must be removed it isn't a big job.  Remove your water connections, your air hose and electrical systems and the unit will come right out.  Your electrical systems are hooked up with keyed plugs so there's no soldering or wiring involved. The biggest problem is getting at it.

Pete37



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