Air as a Tool
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 895 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: September 30, 2010
There are so many things that we should “always have” on a boat that I groan when I hear somebody tell me about something else. So get ready to groan. Do you have a good source of compressed air aboard? (Other than the obvious?) Compressed air can solve more problems than you’d ever want to think about.
For example, we can use it to blow out dirty starters or alternators. We can use it to quickly and forcefully dry parts. We can use it (not with too much force) to clean out onboard electronic equipment, not to mention computer keyboards and mother boards. If you have a desk...... Read More

Tom’s Tips About Using Air
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 922 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: September 30, 2010
1. Even air can cause injury. Obviously don’t squirt it in your eye etc. Also be on guard for dust or small particles of debris becoming airborne.
2. Quick connect devices make it much easier and quicker to change tools. These are readily available and not too expensive. Be sure you get the right size for the fittings and your tools.
3. If you’re using a quick connect fitting be careful to turn off the tank valve and empty the hose before you pull the collar back on the fitting. If you don’t, the air pressure in the hose can blow off the connected tool, possibly causing ...... Read More

Blog test
Contributed by Chuck Fort - This blog has been viewed 2178 times and there are 1 comments
Posted: September 28, 2010
Found this on a Viking 32. Looks like the hose is past its prime.




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East Coast Alerts by Mel Neale September 16, 2010
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 1188 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: September 16, 2010
Dismal Swamp Canal Reduced Lock Schedule:
A local Norfolk area TV station has reported that the Dismal Swamp Canal Lock/Bridges are on a reduced schedule due to the drought which has decreased the amount of water available in Lake Drummond for lock operations. Currently, the locks will be open twice a day at 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. rather than four times daily. This schedule will be in effect until further notice.*
*Italicized text above and below indicates our comment or paraphrase. Plain text is copied from the Notices to Mariners or other sources given.
Hazardous Ops off Flor...... Read More

If Your Anchor Could Talk
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 1062 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: September 16, 2010
Dragging is a drag. A few weeks ago we put the CQR anchor down in an area where we’d anchored many times before. We knew that the bottom was perfect. We were ready for a nice evening, not for hassle. Hassle we got. The anchor dragged along the bottom like it had wheels. I pulled it up so that we could move over to a different spot, a few yards away. When it broke the surface I saw the ancient long dead remnants of a huge oyster shell stuck on the point. I had to knock it off with a boathook. I wanted to know if this was an anomaly or the norm in this, one of our favorite spots in the area...... Read More

Toms Tips About Knowing Your Bottom
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 1012 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: September 16, 2010
1. A clean anchor can mean that the bottom is very hard, as with tightly packed sand, which is going to be very poor holding for most anchors.
2. Loose mud of very low viscosity on your anchor may mean that the mud is too soft to hold well, but not necessarily. Often a layer of very soft mud covers a deep layer of thicker good holding mud. If there’s nowhere else to go, try to work your anchor down deeper by putting out more chain, letting the rig settle awhile before backing down, and then backing very slowly.
3. If you think you’re going to need to spend time working your an...... Read More

Reflecting Pool
Contributed by kismet - This blog has been viewed 954 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: September 15, 2010
As we carefully exited the beautiful, friendly Trent-Severn Waterway and gently slid into the open waters of Georgian Bay the realization that we were just a breath away from our home waters of the Great Lakes slowly crept into our thoughts. Jim and I first began to quietly reflect on the scope and breadth of the adventure behind us. Then it was all we could talk about. We shared our excitement while anticipating the return home to family, friends and a familiar lifestyle but we also took time to look back. Sure, we still had some of the most beautiful parts of Canada to cruise through but havi...... Read More

Red Sea Sailing
Contributed by Feel Free - This blog has been viewed 1806 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: September 15, 2010
By Liz Tosoni

Killarney, Ont.
Feel Free is still high and dry in Curacao, waiting patiently for her owners. This gives me a little more time to think back on some of our (not too long ago) exotic cruising. Soon enough, the work will be done and we’ll be out there on the water again. Last log, we were sailing up the Red Sea, and had finally made it into marsa country. It was time to do some marsa hopping.




... Read More

The Annapolis Boat Shows
Contributed by Membership - This blog has been viewed 4339 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Membership
Posted: September 08, 2010
A Special Place, A Special Time: The Annapolis Boat Shows
By Capt. Rick Franke
Autumn, especially the month of October, has always been a special time on Chesapeake Bay. Cool, crisp nights are followed by warm, sunny days. Gone is summer’s enervating heat, haze and humidity, replaced by blue skies filled with skeins of honking Canada geese on their annual southerly migration. In 1970 something new was added to this special season; the Annual Annapolis Boat Shows.
Prior to 1970 most major boat shows were held indoors in the winter months in drafty armories or coliseums in major cities...... Read More

The Good Old Days???
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 875 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: September 02, 2010
I miss the good old days of boating. Like when the high tech way to change your oil was to get a drill pump and connect it to an electric drill. There was only one thing for sure when you used one of those. You either changed oil naked or you ruined every stitch of clothes you had on.
These pumps had two hoses and an impeller in a little plastic case. All you had to do was hold one hose in the oil dipstick hole. And hold one hose in the oil waste container. And hold that container in place so that it wouldn’t fall over and dump all the old oil in the bilge. And hold onto the electric d...... Read More