The Upside of Downsizing
Contributed by kismet - This blog has been viewed 1234 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 30, 2010
By Jim Favors
It was amazing to me to see how much “stuff” we kept taking off of our old boat, the 40’ trawler, when we sold it. Lisa kept reminding me that it had been our home for the last five years so I kind of understood, but it seemed to me like we made a lot of trips up and down the dock moving our personal belongings off. What I understood Lisa to state was that our boat home was no different than a land based home in that we filled every nook and cranny with personal and work items. Because we lived on Kismet full-time and worked from the boat, we gradually began to ...... Read More

Hunkering Down for a Hurricane
Contributed by Feel Free - This blog has been viewed 819 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 30, 2010

By Tom Morkin
Lat 12 30 N, Long 69 48 W
Aruba, Netherland Antilles Caribbean Sea
There’s nothing like the unexpected approach of a hurricane to make you re-prioritize your short term plans. We had only been one night in Aruba, anchored off the town of Oranjestad. We were looking forward to a week or so of playing tourists before heading to Cartagena Colombia when we learned about Tomas. He was a newly developed tropical storm passing through the Grenadine Islands of the southeastern Caribbean.



... Read More

Emergencies at Sea, Any Day Will Do
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 521 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 23, 2010
They’re words you perhaps desperately need to hear but when you hear them they can be frightening—especially if you understand why you’re hearing them. They’re instructions from a USCG helo when it’s lowering a pump or basket or other equipment to a boat in distress at sea.
The instructions include things like giving you a direction and speed to steer—if you can. They include stopping your radar, taking down antenna, fishing rigs and any other removable high appendages, securing loose items on deck, preparing for very high wind from the rotors, and not ...... Read More

Toms Tips for Preparing Yourself for Trouble at Sea
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 503 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: December 23, 2010
1. Carefully store your emergency equipment so that you know where it is and can easily and quickly get it when you need it. This may involve relocating certain equipment to pre-planned spots when you go out. But you dont want to have to take time to think about where something is.
2. Emergency equipment, in addition to the obvious, which would take a book to list, should include flashlights, personal strobe lights, a modern EPIRB which is registered and updated for the trip, hand held VHF with fresh or charged batteries, lines, boat hooks, MOB equipment (which you should know how to use), a...... Read More

East Coast Alerts by Mel Neale December 23, 2010
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 684 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: December 23, 2010
Attention Snowbirds
Reminder: Canaveral Lock to Close Dec. 27, 2010:
From a Notice to Navigation Interests, USACE Jacksonville District: *
Canaveral Lock will be closed starting on 27 December 2010 through 24 February 2011. The lock will be re-opened for a NASA launch from 25 February 2011 through 14 March 2011. The lock will be closed from 15 March 2011 through 22 April 2011 to complete the Manatee Protections System installation. The lock will be reopened on 23 April 2011.
The exact closure dates are tentative and are based on the current NASA launch schedule and the USFWS and FWC approv...... Read More

A Day in the Life - Our Passage to Aruba
Contributed by Feel Free - This blog has been viewed 1076 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 15, 2010


By Liz Tosoni

Island of Aruba, ABC Islands Caribbean Sea
0800 “Not a bad way to kick off the season, love.”
“I have to agree. This is the first time we’ve really had the chance to relax since we got back to the boat. It’s downright peaceful out here, seas are slight and we’ll just see what the day brings. There’s no hurry.”
“Plus there are no thunder bumpers up there, no chance of a thunderstorm that I can see and aside from th...... Read More

The New Plan!
Contributed by kismet - This blog has been viewed 904 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 15, 2010
By Jim Favors
When Lisa and I embarked on our first Great Loop trip in 2005, we never, ever could have fathomed that we would have become full-time “liveaboards” for a period of five years. We didn’t start with this as an objective, it just kind of fell into place as we, very quickly, fell in love with the nomadic lifestyle, which is very much the nature of full-time cruising. So, after five years of traveling by boat on U.S. coastal and inland waterways including Washington’s San Juan Islands, the Bahamas’, Canada’s Trent-Severn Waterway and North Channel,...... Read More

Where I Prefer to Go Aground
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 796 times and there are 0 comments
Posted In Cruising Log
Posted: December 09, 2010
My favorite place to run aground is in the ICW of Georgia. Or North Florida. Or southern South Carolina. As you can see, I’m not overly choosy as to where I like to run aground. I’m sure there are other good places to do it, but these are high on my list, and I’ve sampled many.
These areas aren’t just arbitrarily chosen or the result of some fanciful whim. They have two important things in common. The first is a tidal range of six to eight feet. The second is lots of really soft mud. Sure, there are some sand banks here and there, mostly near the inlets, but I try...... Read More

Toms Tips About Bottom Maintenance When Aground
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 649 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: December 09, 2010
1. Some people in areas of extreme tides use them to save haulout bills for sailboats and other keel boats.
2. It’s always better to just go to a yard. If anything goes wrong and the boat topples, it could severely damage the boat and it could kill whoever is working underneath it. Obviously, I don’t recommend this.
3. If you must do this, pick your place and bottom carefully to avoid debris, too much slope, and damaging wake from passing boats.
4. Close all seacocks, portholes and other places where water could enter the boat if something goes wrong.
5. Sometimes if a...... Read More

East Coast Alerts by Mel Neale December 9, 2010
Contributed by Tom Neale - This blog has been viewed 758 times and there are 0 comments
Posted: December 09, 2010
Attention Snowbirds
Update: Cumberland Dividings Shoaling:
Severe Shoaling has been reported in the vicinity of Cumberland Dividings. All mariners are advised to transit the area with caution. (as reported in 7th District LNMs 47, 48 and 49) NOTE: This refers to a confusing stretch of the AICW shown on the paper charts and electronic chartplotters in the area where the southern end of the Brickhill River feeds into the Cumberland River in the vicinity of red “60” through red “62A” and green “63”. Boats run aground frequently here. The magenta line even show...... Read More