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Tom’s Tips About Cap Seals

By Tom Neale - Published November 29, 2007 - Viewed 790 times

1. Whenever I buy a quart or gallon of oil or container of additive, I check to see if it is sealed before I leave the store. I’ve heard of instances when high dollar oils have been substituted with cheaper stuff that can harm engines or void warranties. That seems like a lot of work for very small gain for a thief, but there’s no need for you and I to take the chance. Just check for an intact seal.

2. Before you start the job of pouring in the oil or additive, have ready a knife or a straight edge screwdriver. With a knife you can usually slip the blade under the seal at its edge and neatly peel it away. With a screwdriver you can make a neat incision allowing you to peel away the seal.

3. Never pour with the seal pressed against the side, even though it seems to be still securely bonded to the lip.

4. If a seal finds its way into the tank, do all you can to safely find and remove it. If you don’t it’s going to stay there, waiting to cause a problem probably when you least need it.

5. Often a seal will float for awhile. This seldom helps if it’s gone down a hose into an internal fuel tank, but it may give you a chance to find and retrieve it in an oil tank or external outboard motor tank.

6. Don’t look for the seal in a gas tank with a flashlight or any other type of light unless you’re sure it’s ignition proof and designed and built for the purpose.

7. If the seal falls into the jug from which you’re pouring, use a funnel with a screen as you pour the product. You should always have one of these around. 8. Watch mechanics working on your boat. They are usually required to beat a clock, and occasionally someone will take a short cut when pouring from a jug with a seal.

Go to www.tomneale.com for other information

Boating and water sports involve risk. Any comments herein should be followed at your own risk. You assume all responsibility for risk or injury to yourself or others. Any person or entity that uses this information in any way, as a condition of that use, agrees to waive and does waive and also hold authors harmless from any and all claims which may arise from or be related to that use.

Copyright 2004-2010 Tom Neale





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