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NEWS from BoatUS
Boat Owners Association of The United States
880 S. Pickett St., Alexandria, VA 22304
BoatUS Press Room at www.BoatUS.com/PressRoom

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Contact: D. Scott Croft, 703-461-2864, SCroft@BoatUS.com

Boaters Overstaying Their Welcome Could Find Themselves in Hot Water with the Tax Man

States Go After Visiting Cruisers

Photo Caption: BoatUS says boaters should be aware of local taxes when they cruise.
Download hi-res photo.
 
ALEXANDRIA, Va., September 11, 2012 – Staying too long in one place can ruin a good thing. At least that’s the case with boaters making lengthy journeys, who are finding themselves targets of cash-hungry states when they stay too long and are subject to various taxes. But how can boaters prevent overstaying their welcome? Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS)has online state tax information at www.BoatUS.com/gov/states that will help keep them on the right side of the law and out of hot water with the taxman.
 
In most states, a privately-owned recreational boat must be registered in the state where it is principally used, and any sales and use taxes paid to that state. A problem arises when the boat leaves this principal-use state and enters a new one, for a long visit, extended cruise or lengthy repairs. This could include “Snowbirds” – boaters who head south each winter in search of warmer climates.
 
BoatUS says boaters may be subject to various sales, use, excise, or property taxes when they remain in one location for a consecutive number of days, or over-stay their visit for a certain number of aggregate days per year. This “grace period” is often 60 to 90 days but as little as 30 days in two states (CO, NH). Also, if the principal state’s sales and use tax is not comparable to the tax in the state the boat is visiting, the second state can levy their own tax making the boat owner liable for the difference.
 
To help boaters understand this issue, BoatUS’ online map at www.BoatUS.com/gov/states highlights state sales and property tax rates with links to state tax departments, as well as registration information and “grace periods”.
 
In the past, BoatUS has heard about tax authorities walking the docks, inspecting marina records and aggressively enforcing tax codes. “We believe boaters should pay their fair share of taxes, and travel to other states with their eyes open about timelines and potential tax assessments,” said BoatUS President Margaret Podlich. “Boaters should keep recordkeeping such as log entries, marina and fuel receipts or repair contracts while traveling. These documents are critical for boaters to keep, and are often the only way to fight an unjust tax bill,” added Podlich.
 
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About BoatUS:
 
BoatUS is the nation’s leading advocate for recreational boaters providing its over half million members with government representation, services such as on-the-water boat towing, roadside assistance and specialized boat insurance programs, boating safety, damage avoidance, clean water and consumer advocacy efforts as well as angler services and money saving benefits. For membership information visit www.BoatUS.com or call 800-395-2628.